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Iowa's Section 303(d) Impaired Waters Listings

Under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act, states are required from "time to time" to submit a list of waters for which effluent limits will not be sufficient to meet all state water quality standards. EPA has defined "time to time" to mean April 1 of even numbered years. The failure to meet water quality standards might be due to an individual pollutant, multiple pollutants, "pollution," or an unknown cause of impairment. The 303(d) listing process includes waters impaired by point sources and non-point sources of pollutants.

Iowa Daily Erosion Project (Version 1)

This project is a collaboration of scientists at Iowa State University, National Soil Erosion Research Lab, National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment, and The University of Iowa. The aim is to produce daily estimates of rainfall, runoff, and soil erosion for the state of Iowa. Our work is sponsored by Department of Agronomy's Path to the Future endowment.

Iowa Water Center

Established in 1964, the Iowa Center (IWC) is a federally funded program. Its purposes are to identify research needs and fund selected projects about Iowa’s water quality, water quantity, and the human dimensions of water-resources management, provide outreach and education opportunities to familiarize water-resource professionals, teachers, and students with current research about Iowa’s water resources, disseminate information about Iowa’s water resources to water-resource specialists, teachers, students, policymakers, and the general public.

USGS Iowa Continuous Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring

The "Real-time" map tracks short-term changes (over several hours) of water quality. Although the general appearance of the map changes very little from one hour to the next, individual sites may change rapidly in response to major rain events or to reservoir releases. The data used to produce this map are provisional.

Watershed Leadership Curriculum

This Watershed Group Development Guide has been organized into six major topic areas; Leadership, Watershed Group Development, Performance-based Environmental Management, Water Quality and Watersheds, Water Quality, Strategies for Teaching, and Topics of Interest. The topics can be utilized separately, or as a complete curriculum, according to the skill sets and information needs of the participants. Modules 4 and 16 have been included as topics of interest; other related topics could be substituted according to the interests of the group.

Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship - Division of Soil Conservation & Water Quality

Land stewardship is central to the work of the Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship. The Division of Soil Conservation provides farmers with expertise and funds to help them install practices that preserve our highly productive soil, prevent erosion and protect our critical waterways. The Department is focused on making sure future Iowans can experience the same high quality of life that past generations have enjoyed in our state.

Iowa Flood Center

The Iowa Flood Center (IFC) provides Iowans information to help individuals and communities understand flood risks. The IFC is actively engaged in flood projects in several Iowa communities and employs several graduate and undergraduate students participating in flood-related research. IFC researchers have designed a cost-efficient sensor network to better monitor stream flow in the state; have developed a library of flood-inundation maps for several Iowa communities; and are working on a large project to develop new floodplain map for 85 of Iowa’s 99 counties.
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