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Cigarette paper webworms 2023

June 14, 2023

Here is a very rare problem in lawns.  My last blog on it was June 19, 2017 (https://www.extension.iastate.edu/turfgrass/search/content/cigarett%20paper).  This sighting is from Debbie Wynkoop in Elysian, MN.

The problem is caused by an insect called the Burrowing Webworm.  It is in the genus Acrolophus.  Other common names include Cigarette paper webworm or tube moth.  There are reportedly 65 species within the genus.  Like the more common Sod Webworm, the larvae live in a web-lined burrow just under the surface of the lawn.  In the case of the Burrowing webworm, birds feeding on the larvae pull out the webbing, consume the larvae and leave the cigarette paper-like webbing on the surface.  It is not usual to see hundreds of these on the lawn after birds have been there.  They disappear very quickly with moisture and the larvae are generally not seen because the birds ate them. 

While the larvae can feed on turf, they rarely do any serious damage to lawns.  Most common insecticides for surface feeders will kill them.  However, most of them are generally gone because of bird feeding when the paper-like burrow is observed and insecticides would not be recommended. 

 

Here are the pictures from Minnesota:

 

 

 

 

 

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CIGARETTE PAPER WEBWORM

June 19, 2017

Here is an interesting lawn problem that is quite rare, but seems to come up almost every spring here in Iowa.  People will call and say that they appear to have cigarette papers all over their lawn.  They usually do not see an insect associated with the problem and the question is, “what could possibly cause this?”   

The problem is caused by an insect called the Burrowing Webworm.  It is in the genus Acrolophus.  Other common names include Cigarette paper webworm or tube moth.  There are reportedly 65 species within the genus.  Like the more common Sod Webworm, the larvae live in a web-lined burrow just under the surface of the lawn.  In the case of the Burrowing webworm, birds feeding on the larvae pull out the webbing, consume the larvae and leave the cigarette paper-like webbing on the surface.  It is not usual to see hundreds of these on the lawn after birds have been there.  They disappear very quickly with moisture and the larvae are generally not seen because the birds ate them. 

While the larvae can feed on turf, they rarely do any serious damage to lawns.  Most common insecticides for surface feeders will kill them.  However, most of them are generally gone because of bird feeding when the paper-like burrow is observed and insecticides would not be recommended. 

I would like some more pictures of the papers.  If any one sees them, send the pictures to Nick Christians at  nchris@iastate.edu.

 

Picture of Cigarette paper-like burrow lining.  Courtesy of Laura Iles of the Plant and Insect Diagnosis Clinic at Iowa State University.

 

 

Picture of adult Burrowing Webworm from the web.  It is from New Hampshire Public Television. 

 

 

I received the following pictures from Gary McVay.  They are from St. Charles Ia, south of Des Moines.  They were taken the week of June 19, 2017.

 

 

 

 

In this picture the hole from which the larvae and paper were taken by birds is visible.

Here are a couple more from the Boone, Ia area from 6/23/17.

 

 

 

Here are two new ones from the Ames area, 6/27/17

 

 

Here are a few more from 6/27/17.  These are from Ida County.

 

 

Yet another one from the North side of Ames on 7/5/17

 

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INTERNSHIP REPORT-ADAM GREGERSEN

January 23, 2012

Nick Christians
January 23, 2012

Here is a good internship report by undergraduate student Adam Gregersen on his experience with the Iowa State University Athletic Department. You can get the report to go full-screen by clicking on the lower right hand side of the document.

The recent rain and snow has given us some reprieve on the potential for winter damage, but the long range forecast is still for some mild weather during the critical weeks of winter. We'll keep you posted on the topdressing trial as the winter progresses.
 

Internship paper final

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Blog Use in the Turfgrass Industry

March 2, 2011

March is officially here which means that another growing season is fast approaching. iaTURF will already be entering its third year in operation! We will continue to bring you timely updates on interesting topics through the blog.

Blogging and the use of social media have really changed the way people communicate. In the academic world, one way we communicate with our peers is by writing papers, or manuscripts. To let people know about the success of blogging as a means to communicate with turfgrass professionals, iaTURF co-authored a paper with the Turf Disease Blog.

The Turf Disease Blog is one I like to follow. Content for this blog is provided by turfgrass pathologists across the U.S. If you’re not familiar with their blog you should definitely check it out.

A summary of our article is below. Click here to read the full article from the Journal of Extension.

Using Blogs to Disseminate Information in the Turfgrass Industry

Jones, Marcus A.; Kaminski, John E.; Christians, Nick E.; Hoffmann, Mark D.

The ability to provide regional information to turfgrass professionals in a timely format can help them avoid potential problems. While traditional, hard-copy based Extension materials can provide a wealth of information, the ability to communicate brief yet current updates can be invaluable. Two Web-based blogs were developed to provide information to turfgrass managers on a local (iaTURF) and international level (Turf Diseases). Data indicated that the blogs reached an average of 34.9 to 148.4 people per day. The use of blogs is an effective means to deliver timely information to a geographically diverse and large number of turfgrass managers.

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RUST, LEAF SPOT, AND DOLLAR SPOT

March 13, 2014

I am currently teaching the advanced turf course, Hort 451, on the web.  A part of that course, each student completes a paper or project.  Mary Broadfoot, a senior in Animal Ecology, chose to do 9 extension type bulletins.  Three of these are on turf diseases, three are on insects, and three are on weeds.

These tuned out so well that I have decided to share them on the blog site.  I will include them three at a time over the next few days.  The first three are on diseases.  She chose Rust, Leaf Spot, and Dollar Spot.

They are attached as pdf files below.  You can get the full text by clicking on the individual words below.  Several of the pictures used are from the internet.  She has sited each location from which information was used.

 Rust

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzSX2eos6s6hbTVHTEMxUktYREE/edit?usp=sh...

 Leaf Spot

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzSX2eos6s6hMkNVaHZBV19tY0k/edit?usp=sh...

Dollar Spot

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzSX2eos6s6hMGMxV3UxcTY0SFE/edit?usp=sh...

 

 

 

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INTERNATIONAL TURFGRASS RESEARCH CONFERENCE IN BEIJING CHINA

July 23, 2013

Dan Strey and myself spent last week in Beijing China for the 12th International Turfgrass Research conference.  It was an excellent meeting, with more than 300 people in attendance.  As you can see, we had a beautiful, clear day at the Great Wall.  
 

Great Wall of China

It was a little hazy for the  Forbidden City.

Iowa State was well represented with 6 papers that are listed below.  Full text of these will be up on the Turfgrass Information Service soon.  I can also send full text to anyone who would like them.

  • ENHANCED HERBICIDAL ACTIVITY OF CORN GLUTEN MEAL THROUGH PH MODIFICATION.  ~N.J. Dunlap, N.N. Boersma and N.E. Christians
  • EFFECT OF SHOOT DENSITY ON THE RECUPERATIVE POTENTIAL OF CREEPING BENTGRASS CUTLIVARS.  ~Marcus A. Jones and Nick E. Christians
  • Core Aeration Programs and Sand Topdressing Improve Creeping Bentgrass Fairways  ~Matthew T. Klingenberg, Deying Li, Nick E. Christians* and Christopher J. Blume
  • Influence of an amino acid complex on the growth of Agrostis stolonifera L. cv. Penncross  ~Quincy D. Law*, Marcus A. Jones, Aaron J. Patton, and Nick E. Christians
  • Basic Cation Saturation Ratio Theory Applied to Sand-Based Putting Greens  ~R.A. St. John* and N.E. Christians
  • SEEDBANKING POTENTIAL OF KENTUCKY BLUEGRASS AND PERENNIAL RYEGRASS IN ATHLETIC FIELDS.  ~A.H. Hoiberg and D.D. Minner

 

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CORAL FUNGI IN LAWNS

June 20, 2013

Here is a new one for me.  These pictures are from Melissa Irizarry in the Plant and Insect Diagnostic laboratory at Iowa State University.  It was found in an Iowa Lawn.  She identified it as Coral Fungi.  Here is what Wikipedia has to say about it:

The clavarioid fungi are a group of fungi in the Basidiomycota typically having erect, simple or branched basidiocarps (fruit bodies) that are formed on the ground, on decaying vegetation, or on dead wood. They are colloquially called club fungi and coral fungi. Originally such fungi were referred to the genus Clavaria ("clavarioid" means Clavaria-like), but it is now known that clavarioid species are not all closely related. Since they are often studied as a group, it is convenient to retain the informal (non-taxonomic) name of "clavarioid fungi" and this term is frequently used in research papers.

I have never seen it before.  I am wondering if anyone else out there is running into it.  Let me know by e-mail  nchris@iastate.edu.
 

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CIVITAS DEMO AT THE ISU TURF RES. AREA

June 22, 2012

Here is a post from our new turf research specialist at the turf research area, Dan Strey.  He recently took Marcus Jone's place when Marcus took a job in industry.

Dan Strey

June 20, 2012

As newer turf products begin to hit the market, superintendents begin to have certain questions.  Ever since Civitas has reached the Iowa marketplace, we have been asked numerous questions regarding the product. One of which was if there are signs of tracking after application.

This week, we designed a demonstration that would determine just that.  The Civitas Fungicide was applied at a rate of 8oz. per 1,000 ft² and the Civitas Harmonizer at 0.5oz. per 1,000 ft².  It was then applied to bentgrass maintained at green height. There were five test plots that each measured 25 ft². Each plot was then walked across, using white paper towels to indicate tracking, every half hour. Three golf balls were rolled through each plot as well.

It was only a half hour after the application that we found no evidence of tracking. Hopefully, this helps some of you out there. 

 

 

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INFLUENCE OF AN AMINO ACID COMPLEX ON THE GROWTH OF AGROSTIS STOLONIFERA L. CV. PENNCROSS

February 27, 2014

Here is our paper from the international Journal that was published in conjunction with the International Turfgrass Society meeting that took place in Beijing, China last summer.  The abstract is as follows:

ABSTRACT

Biostimulants are products able to stimulate plant growth and metabolism with a response not attributed to mineral nutrition. Biostimulant products have been shown to increase turfgrass tolerance to heat and drought, as well as increase tillering in wheat. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of an amino acid complex on the culture and shoot density of creeping bentgrass in comparison to nitrogen, a commercial sea plant extract, and another amino acid containing biostimulant. Research was conducted at the Iowa State University Horticulture Research Station on ‘Penncross’ creeping bentgrass mown at 1.3 cm and established on a United States Golf Association sand-based rootzone. Clipping yield did not vary among treatments in this experiment. The 2.9 kg N ha-1 rate of the amino acid complex
was found to be the most effective treatment to maintain or increase shoot density in the trial. The amino acid complex at 2.9 kg N ha-1 had 15% greater shoot densities than the same rate of N from urea and the 17% greater shoot densities than the commercial sea plant extract over the two dates out of nine that they differed, both occurring during stressful summer conditions. This research demonstrates that applications of an amino acid complex have the potential to increase shoot densities in a mature stand of ‘Penncross’ creeping bentgrass without stimulating shoot growth.

The citation for the article is:

Law, Q.D., M.A. Jones, A. J. Patton, and N. E. Christians. 2013. Influence of an amino acid complex on the growth of Agrostis stolonifera L. cv. Penncross. International Turfgrass Journal.  12:485-489.

The full text can be obtained in pdf form by clicking on the word Quincy.

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