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2019 Soil Health Conference Registration Now Open

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 15:23

Soil health is the foundation for a vibrant and strong agriculture system and economy. Healthy soils are essential to healthy environments including clean air and clean water for sustainable agriculture and livelihoods. The 2019 Soil Health Conference will be held in Ames at the Scheman Building at Iowa State University on February 4-5, 2019. Registration is now open. This conference is organized by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the Department of Agronomy. The 2019 theme is “Science Meets Practice for Advancing Soil Health” in Iowa and the Midwest.

This two-day soil health conference will host a number of renowned scientists, agronomists, framers, and conservationists as conference speakers. Presentations at the conference will address concerns and interests of farmers, agronomists, agricultural consultants, soil scientists, extension professionals, and policy makers who are interested in learning about soils for sustainable agriculture.

During the two-day conference, research-based information addressing the soil health principles and management practices in decision-making for building healthy soils, sustainable agriculture, and a clean environment will be presented. Panel discussions led by farmers, agronomists, and scientists along with a new and unique session where attendees can “Ask the Experts” will be included. This information will be provided by scientists from Land-grant universities, USDA-ARS, USDA-NRCS, farmers and leaders in the agriculture sector. Posters on research and education addressing management practices and their effects on soil health will be displayed during the two days conference.

This conference will provide an opportunity for certified crop advisors who are eligible to earn continued education credits in soil and water by attending many of the breakout sessions. Program, invited speakers and registration information can be found on the conference website. Registration is currently open and we look forward to see you February 4- 5, 2019 for the conference. Don’t miss the opportunity to learn more about soil health and develop a network with other industry professionals.

Category: SoilsSoil ManagementTags: soil healthsoil health conferenceAuthor: Mahdi Al-KaisiCrop(s): CornSoybeanCover Crop

Farmers, scientists and industry to speak at 2017 Soil Health Conference

Fri, 01/27/2017 - 08:04

The second annual Soil Health Conference will be held in Ames, Iowa at the Scheman Building at Iowa State University on February 16-17, 2017.

This two-day soil health conference will host a number of renowned scientists, agronomists, farmers, and agriculture business personnel as conference speakers. Presentations by scientists from land-grant universities, USDA-ARS, USDA-NRCS, and the agriculture sector will address concerns and interests of farmers, agronomists, agricultural consultants, soil scientists, extension professionals, and policy makers who are interested in learning about soils for sustainable agriculture.

  • Speakers include Steven Shafer, Chief Scientific Officer of the Soil Health Institute (effective May 2016); David Archer, research agriculturist with USDA-ARS, Kristine Nichols, soil microbiologist for USDA, and Richard Cruse, professor of soil science in the Department of Agronomy at Iowa State University. View a complete list of conference speakers here

CCA credits, poster presentation
This conference will provide an opportunity to Certified Crop Advisers who are eligible to earn continued education credits in soil and water by attending many breakout sessions. Students, scientists, faculty, agronomists, and researchers are invited to submit a poster that shares research across all disciplines related to soil health for the the poster presentation at the 2017 Soil Health Conference. First, second, and third place winners will each receive a monetary award.

Register by Feb. 1
Registration is currently open. Sign up by Feb. 1 to save $35 on the registration fee. Register online and visit the 2017 Soil Health Conference website to view the preliminary conference program and speakers.

Please save the date for February 16-17, 2017 and take advantage of this opportunity to learn about soil health and network with other professionals.

Category: SoilsSoil ManagementTags: soil health conferenceeventsSoil ManagementAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Farmers, scientists and industry to speak at 2017 Soil Health Conference

Fri, 01/27/2017 - 08:04

The second annual Soil Health Conference will be held in Ames, Iowa at the Scheman Building at Iowa State University on February 16-17, 2017.

This two-day soil health conference will host a number of renowned scientists, agronomists, farmers, and agriculture business personnel as conference speakers. Presentations by scientists from land-grant universities, USDA-ARS, USDA-NRCS, and the agriculture sector will address concerns and interests of farmers, agronomists, agricultural consultants, soil scientists, extension professionals, and policy makers who are interested in learning about soils for sustainable agriculture.

  • Speakers include Steven Shafer, Chief Scientific Officer of the Soil Health Institute (effective May 2016); David Archer, research agriculturist with USDA-ARS, Kristine Nichols, soil microbiologist for USDA, and Richard Cruse, professor of soil science in the Department of Agronomy at Iowa State University. View a complete list of conference speakers here

CCA credits, poster presentation
This conference will provide an opportunity to Certified Crop Advisers who are eligible to earn continued education credits in soil and water by attending many breakout sessions. Students, scientists, faculty, agronomists, and researchers are invited to submit a poster that shares research across all disciplines related to soil health for the the poster presentation at the 2017 Soil Health Conference. First, second, and third place winners will each receive a monetary award.

Register by Feb. 1
Registration is currently open. Sign up by Feb. 1 to save $35 on the registration fee. Register online and visit the 2017 Soil Health Conference website to view the preliminary conference program and speakers.

Please save the date for February 16-17, 2017 and take advantage of this opportunity to learn about soil health and network with other professionals.

Category: SoilsSoil ManagementTags: soil health conferenceeventSoil ManagementAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Registration now open for 2017 Soil Health Conference in Ames, Iowa

Tue, 11/01/2016 - 10:40

Building on the success of the Inaugural Soil Health Conference in 2016, the second Soil Health Conference will be held in the Scheman Building at Iowa State University on February 16-17, 2017. This conference is organized by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and the Department of Agronomy.

Soil health is the foundation for a vibrant and stronger agriculture system and economy. Healthy soils are essential to healthy environments, including clean air and clean water for sustainable agriculture and livelihoods. The theme of the 2017 Soil Health Conference is “Building Soil Health for Healthy Environment and Farm Profitability” in Iowa and the Midwest.

Conference will offer:

*Research-based information. During the two days conference, research-based information addressing the soil health principles and management practices for best decision-making for building healthy soils, sustainable agriculture, and clean environment will be presented.

*Speakers from land-grant universities and USDA. The Soil Health Conference will host a number of renowned scientists, agronomists, framers, and conservationists as conference speakers. Information will be provided by scientists from land-grant universities, USDA-ARS, USDA-NRCS, farmers and agriculture sector.

*Wide range of topics. Presentations at the conference will address concerns and interests of farmers, agronomists, agricultural consultants, soil scientists, extension professionals, and policy makers who are interested in learning about soils for sustainable agriculture.

*Posters  on research and education. Posters on research and education addressing management practices and their effects on soil health will be displayed during the two days of the soil health conference.

*CCA credits. This conference will provide an opportunity to certified crop advisors who are eligible to earn continued education credits in soil and water by attending many breakout sessions.

Register Now
Please register online. Click here to view a preliminary conference program, and catch highlights from the 2016 Soil Health Conference in this video. Join the discussion on Twitter and keep up on conference announcements using the hashtag #2017SHC.

Please save the date for February 16-17, 2017, and take advantage of this gathering to learn about soil health and develop a network with other professionals.

(Click image for larger view)

Category: Soil ManagementTags: soil health conferenceeventsAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Registration now open for 2017 Soil Health Conference in Ames, Iowa

Tue, 11/01/2016 - 10:40

Building on the success of the Inaugural Soil Health Conference in 2016, the second Soil Health Conference will be held in the Scheman Building at Iowa State University on February 16-17, 2017. This conference is organized by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and the Department of Agronomy.

Soil health is the foundation for a vibrant and stronger agriculture system and economy. Healthy soils are essential to healthy environments, including clean air and clean water for sustainable agriculture and livelihoods. The theme of the 2017 Soil Health Conference is “Building Soil Health for Healthy Environment and Farm Profitability” in Iowa and the Midwest.

Conference will offer:

*Research-based information. During the two days conference, research-based information addressing the soil health principles and management practices for best decision-making for building healthy soils, sustainable agriculture, and clean environment will be presented.

*Speakers from land-grant universities and USDA. The Soil Health Conference will host a number of renowned scientists, agronomists, framers, and conservationists as conference speakers. Information will be provided by scientists from land-grant universities, USDA-ARS, USDA-NRCS, farmers and agriculture sector.

*Wide range of topics. Presentations at the conference will address concerns and interests of farmers, agronomists, agricultural consultants, soil scientists, extension professionals, and policy makers who are interested in learning about soils for sustainable agriculture.

*Posters  on research and education. Posters on research and education addressing management practices and their effects on soil health will be displayed during the two days of the soil health conference.

*CCA credits. This conference will provide an opportunity to certified crop advisors who are eligible to earn continued education credits in soil and water by attending many breakout sessions.

Register Now
Please register online by visiting: register.extension.iastate.edu/soilhealth/registration. Click here to view a preliminary conference program, and catch highlights from the 2016 Soil Health Conference in this video. Join the discussion on Twitter and keep up on conference announcements using the hashtag #2017SHC.

Please save the date for February 16-17, 2017, and take advantage of this gathering to learn about soil health and develop a network with other professionals.

(Click image for larger view)

Category: Soil ManagementTags: soil health conferenceeventsAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

It is not too early to think about next season conservation plans

Tue, 09/13/2016 - 15:50

The early signs of corn and soybean in particular ready for harvest are around the corner, and it is time to think about your next season conservation plans.

Soybean residue is highly degradable and has very limited life time before it gets decomposed and disappears, leaving minimum protection to soil from unexpected rain events. The degradable nature of soybean residue is linked to the low C:N ratio (30:1) compared to corn (75:1). That means soybean fields have very minimum protection and any soil disturbance can do significant damage to soil and water quality through soil erosion.

Generally, conventional tillage whether in corn or soybean ground can be damaging to soil. Research shows limited advantage to tilling corn ground for next season soybean. For more information check: No-Till is Better Choice for Soybean after Corn
 

Related articles:
Hold Off on Tillage This Fall, Keep Soil Covered
Soil Health Benefits for Sustaining Crop Production

Photo: Soybean in no-till by Mahdi Al-Kaisi.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Category: Soil ManagementTags: soybean residueconservation tillageAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

It is not too early to think about next season conservation plans

Tue, 09/13/2016 - 15:50

The early signs of corn and soybean in particular ready for harvest are around the corner, and it is time to think about your next season conservation plans.

Soybean residue is highly degradable and has very limited life time before it gets decomposed and disappears, leaving minimum protection to soil from unexpected rain events. The degradable nature of soybean residue is linked to the low C:N ratio (30:1) compared to corn (75:1). That means soybean fields have very minimum protection and any soil disturbance can do significant damage to soil and water quality through soil erosion.

Generally, conventional tillage whether in corn or soybean ground can be damaging to soil. Research shows limited advantage to tilling corn ground for next season soybean. For more information check: No-Till is Better Choice for Soybean after Corn
 

Related articles:
Hold Off on Tillage This Fall, Keep Soil Covered
Soil Health Benefits for Sustaining Crop Production

Photo: Soybean in no-till by Mahdi Al-Kaisi.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Category: Soil ManagementTags: soybean residueconservation tillageAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Top 10 reasons to avoid soil compaction

Wed, 07/20/2016 - 17:19

This spring consisted of wet field conditions for many regions across Iowa during planting season. When soil moisture is at or exceeds field capacity, there is an increased potential for soil compaction, particularly at topsoil depths. Soil compaction at planting time can impact root growth and development for the rest of the growing season, and can be a serious problem for Iowa farmers. However, with proper field management, compaction can be minimized.

Here are the top 10 reason to avoid soil compaction: 
1. Causes nutrient deficiencies
2. Reduces crop productivity
3. Restricts root development
4. Reduces soil aeration
5. Decreases soil available water
6. Reduces infiltration rate
7. Increases bulk density
8. Increases sediment and nutrient losses
9. Increases surface runoff
10. Damages soil structure

Learn more at 2016 Farm Progress Show
Learn more about the effects of soil compaction on root growth and development and best management practices at the Iowa State University tent at the Farm Progress Show in Boone, Iowa Aug. 31-Sept. 1. The soil health table will have four demonstrations, one which will focus on soil compaction at three different bulk densities. Mahdi Al-Kaisi, professor and extension soil management specialist at Iowa State University, will be present to answer questions, provide resources and discuss soil health management practices.

New soil health publications available
Now available to purchase online at the Extension Store is the Iowa Soil Health Field Guide, which highlights the relationships between soil characteristics and provides information about soil health and its importance to sustainable agriculture systems; the Iowa Soil Health Assessment Card, for field assessment and evaluation of soil health indicators; and the Iowa Soil Health Management Manual, which provides information about soil functions and services that are essential for sustainable agriculture systems. These three publications are products of the collaborative efforts of Iowa State University and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Iowa.

 Related articles:
 Defining Soil Health
 Protect Your Investment by Eliminating Tillage and Keeping Residue
 What is Soil Health and How Can We Improve It?

 

Category: Soil ManagementTags: soil compactionsoil moistureIowa Soil Health Field GuideIowa Soil Health Assessment CardIowa Soil Health Management ManualAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Top 10 reasons to avoid soil compaction

Wed, 07/20/2016 - 17:19

This spring consisted of wet field conditions for many regions across Iowa during planting season. When soil moisture is at or exceeds field capacity, there is an increased potential for soil compaction, particularly at topsoil depths. Soil compaction at planting time can impact root growth and development for the rest of the growing season, and can be a serious problem for Iowa farmers. However, with proper field management, compaction can be minimized.

Here are the top 10 reason to avoid soil compaction: 
1. Causes nutrient deficiencies
2. Reduces crop productivity
3. Restricts root development
4. Reduces soil aeration
5. Decreases soil available water
6. Reduces infiltration rate
7. Increases bulk density
8. Increases sediment and nutrient losses
9. Increases surface runoff
10. Damages soil structure

Learn more at 2016 Farm Progress Show
Learn more about the effects of soil compaction on root growth and development and best management practices at the Iowa State University tent at the Farm Progress Show in Boone, Iowa Aug. 31-Sept. 1. The soil health table will have four demonstrations, one which will focus on soil compaction at three different bulk densities. Mahdi Al-Kaisi, professor and extension soil management specialist at Iowa State University, will be present to answer questions, provide resources and discuss soil health management practices.

New soil health publications available
Now available to purchase online at the Extension Store is the Iowa Soil Health Field Guide, which highlights the relationships between soil characteristics and provides information about soil health and its importance to sustainable agriculture systems; the Iowa Soil Health Assessment Card, for field assessment and evaluation of soil health indicators; and the Iowa Soil Health Management Manual, which provides information about soil functions and services that are essential for sustainable agriculture systems. These three publications are products of the collaborative efforts of Iowa State University and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Iowa.

 Related articles:
 Defining Soil Health
 Protect Your Investment by Eliminating Tillage and Keeping Residue
 What is Soil Health and How Can We Improve It?

 

Category: Soil ManagementTags: soil compactionsoil moistureIowa Soil Health Field GuideIowa Soil Health Assessment CardIowa Soil Health Management ManualAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Earn CCA credits, submit poster at first Iowa Soil Health Conference

Wed, 01/13/2016 - 14:34

Folks will have the opportunity to learn about building healthy soils on Feb. 2-3 at the Scheman Building in Ames, Iowa at the Inaugural Iowa Soil Health Conference.

Producers, agronomists, faculty, scientists, students, and the public will have a chance to listen to invited speakers from the USDA and land-grant universities present research-based information on soil health topics, including: basic concepts of soil health, management strategies, soil conservation practices, managing and monitoring cover crop effects on soil health, and more.

Earn CCA credits
Attendees can earn up to 17 Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) soil and water continuing education credits. The Inaugural Iowa Soil Health Conference will be utilizing the Certified Crop Adviser app in order to record CEUs. For instructions and to download the app, please start here. For individuals without a smart phone, paper forms will be available for sign-in. Click here for a breakdown of CCA credits offered at each session.

Submit a poster
Participants are also invited to share their research across all disciplines related to soil health by submitting a poster for presentation. Guidelines for poster preparation and display can be found here.

How to register
Register online for the conference by Jan. 20 to take advantage of the early registration fee. 

More on soil health
Protect Your Investment by Eliminating Tillage and Keeping Residue

Category: SoilsSoil FertilitySoil ManagementTags: ccacontinuing educationsoil healthconferenceAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Earn CCA credits, submit poster at first Iowa Soil Health Conference

Wed, 01/13/2016 - 14:34

Folks will have the opportunity to learn about building healthy soils on Feb. 2-3 at the Scheman Building in Ames, Iowa at the Inaugural Iowa Soil Health Conference.

Producers, agronomists, faculty, scientists, students, and the public will have a chance to listen to invited speakers from the USDA and land-grant universities present research-based information on soil health topics, including: basic concepts of soil health, management strategies, soil conservation practices, managing and monitoring cover crop effects on soil health, and more.

Earn CCA credits
Attendees can earn up to 17 Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) soil and water continuing education credits. The Inaugural Iowa Soil Health Conference will be utilizing the Certified Crop Adviser app in order to record CEUs. For instructions and to download the app, please start here. For individuals without a smart phone, paper forms will be available for sign-in. Click here for a breakdown of CCA credits offered at each session.

Submit a poster
Participants are also invited to share their research across all disciplines related to soil health by submitting a poster for presentation. Guidelines for poster preparation and display can be found here.

How to register
Register online for the conference by Jan. 20 to take advantage of the early registration fee. 

More on soil health
Protect Your Investment by Eliminating Tillage and Keeping Residue

Category: SoilsSoil FertilitySoil ManagementTags: ccacontinuing educationsoil healthconferenceAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Earn Soil and Water CCA Credits at the Soil Health Conference on February 2-3, 2016

Tue, 12/01/2015 - 10:46

The upcoming soil health conference in Ames, Iowa, February 2-3, 2016 is fast approaching. This Inaugural Soil Health Conference will provide a unique opportunity to Certified Crop Advisers (CCA) who are seeking soil and water credits. The conference has been approved for a total of 17 soil and water credits during the two days.

A wide range of topics addressing principles and management practices that are essential for building soil health and productivity will be covered by well-established scientists from ARS-USDA and land-grant universities. 

Topics will include: soil management practices and cropping systems that are effective in reducing weather variability effects on yield and soil quality, cover crops establishment and their role in reducing soil erosion, cropping systems effect on soil biology, and many other topics will be presented during the conference. 

The conference is designed to provide research-based information for professional agronomists, farmers, and the general public who are interested in building and sustaining soil heath.

Take advantage of this opportunity and visit the conference website:  http://register.extension.iastate.edu/soilhealth . The registration deadline is January 16, 2016.

Category: SoilsTags: Soil Managementsoil healthAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Earn Soil and Water CCA Credits at the Soil Health Conference on February 2-3, 2016

Tue, 12/01/2015 - 10:46

The upcoming soil health conference in Ames, Iowa, February 2-3, 2016 is fast approaching. This Inaugural Soil Health Conference will provide a unique opportunity to Certified Crop Advisers (CCA) who are seeking soil and water credits. The conference has been approved for a total of 17 soil and water credits during the two days.

A wide range of topics addressing principles and management practices that are essential for building soil health and productivity will be covered by well-established scientists from ARS-USDA and land-grant universities. 

Topics will include: soil management practices and cropping systems that are effective in reducing weather variability effects on yield and soil quality, cover crops establishment and their role in reducing soil erosion, cropping systems effect on soil biology, and many other topics will be presented during the conference. 

The conference is designed to provide research-based information for professional agronomists, farmers, and the general public who are interested in building and sustaining soil heath.

Take advantage of this opportunity and visit the conference website:  http://register.extension.iastate.edu/soilhealth . The registration deadline is January 16, 2016.

Category: SoilsTags: Soil Managementsoil healthAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Be aware of potential problems with fall tillage

Mon, 11/09/2015 - 12:16

By: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

The current harvest season has provided excellent soil moisture conditions for harvesting with minimum impact on soil compaction if traffic control is practiced during harvest. Also, the dry soil condition offers good condition for applying anhydrous (if the soil temperature is right below 50oF), where soil closing after injecting the fertilizer is much more efficient to reduce ammonia losses and a good soil condition for storing water from precipitation. 

However, these benefits can be reduced if fields are tilled. Soil tillage increases the potential for soil erosion and reduces water infiltration and subsoil recharge. Keeping crop residue on the soil surface this fall along with cover crops can increase water infiltration, reduce soil erosion, sediment and nutrient loss, contribute to soil organic matter, and improve soil quality. The uncertainty of weather conditions and the need for next season moisture requirements should be kept in mind when planning for the choice of tillage practice this fall. 

Protect your soil, protect your investment. These topics will be addressed at the Upcoming Soil Health Conference on February 2-3, 2016: http://register.extension.iastate.edu/soilhealth.

Category: SoilsSoil FertilitySoil ManagementTags: fall tillagetillagesoil compactionfertilizer applicationfertilizerscropsanhydrous ammoniaammoniareduce ammonia lossAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Be aware of potential problems with fall tillage

Mon, 11/09/2015 - 12:16

By: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

The current harvest season has provided excellent soil moisture conditions for harvesting with minimum impact on soil compaction if traffic control is practiced during harvest. Also, the dry soil condition offers good condition for applying anhydrous (if the soil temperature is right below 50oF), where soil closing after injecting the fertilizer is much more efficient to reduce ammonia losses and a good soil condition for storing water from precipitation. 

However, these benefits can be reduced if fields are tilled. Soil tillage increases the potential for soil erosion and reduces water infiltration and subsoil recharge. Keeping crop residue on the soil surface this fall along with cover crops can increase water infiltration, reduce soil erosion, sediment and nutrient loss, contribute to soil organic matter, and improve soil quality. The uncertainty of weather conditions and the need for next season moisture requirements should be kept in mind when planning for the choice of tillage practice this fall. 

Protect your soil, protect your investment. These topics will be addressed at the Upcoming Soil Health Conference on February 2-3, 2016: http://register.extension.iastate.edu/soilhealth.

Category: SoilsSoil FertilitySoil ManagementTags: fall tillagetillagesoil compactionfertilizer applicationfertilizercropsanhydrous ammoniaammoniareduce ammonia lossAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Learn about building healthy soils in Iowa at the Soil Health Conference in February

Wed, 10/14/2015 - 16:26

By: Mahdi M Al-Kaisi

The Inaugural Soil Health Conference “Strategies for Building Healthy Soils” will be February 2-3, 2016 at the Scheman Building in Ames, Iowa. The goal of this conference is to increase awareness and understanding of soil health as a pivotal measure to sustainable agriculture and environmental quality in Iowa. The conference has been approved for a total of 17 soil and water Certified Crop Advisers (CCA) credits. Click here for a list of speakers presenting at the conference.

Who should attend:

  • Farmers
  • Agricultural consultants
  • Agronomists
  • Extension professionals
  • Soil scientists and students
  • General public and policy makers

Topics will include:

  • The basic concepts of soil health
  • Management practices that build soil health
  • The relationship between soil health, soil sustainability and productivity
  • The role of conservation systems in building soil health
  • Soil health and climate change
  • Farmers perspectives on soil health

Visit the conference website to register. Early registration fee on or before January 16 is $150 per person. After January 16, the fee is $180. For questions about registration, contact Registration Services at 515 294-6222 or email registrations@iastate.edu.

Photo by: Jerry DeWitt

Category: Soil ManagementTags: Soil Managementsoil healthAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi

Learn about building healthy soils in Iowa at the Soil Health Conference in February

Wed, 10/14/2015 - 16:26

By: Mahdi M Al-Kaisi

The Inaugural Soil Health Conference “Strategies for Building Healthy Soils” will be February 2-3, 2016 at the Scheman Building in Ames, Iowa. The goal of this conference is to increase awareness and understanding of soil health as a pivotal measure to sustainable agriculture and environmental quality in Iowa. The conference has been approved for a total of 17 soil and water Certified Crop Advisers (CCA) credits. Click here for a list of speakers presenting at the conference.

Who should attend:

  • Farmers
  • Agricultural consultants
  • Agronomists
  • Extension professionals
  • Soil scientists and students
  • General public and policy makers

Topics will include:

  • The basic concepts of soil health
  • Management practices that build soil health
  • The relationship between soil health, soil sustainability and productivity
  • The role of conservation systems in building soil health
  • Soil health and climate change
  • Farmers perspectives on soil health

Visit the conference website to register. Early registration fee on or before January 16 is $150 per person. After January 16, the fee is $180. For questions about registration, contact Registration Services at 515 294-6222 or email registrations@iastate.edu.

Photo by: Jerry DeWitt

Category: Soil ManagementTags: Soil Managementsoil healthAuthor: Mahdi Al-Kaisi