Livestock

Managing March Madness: Mud in Iowa

Significant presence of mud can increase energy requirements by as much as 30%. Wading through mud burns more calories, resulting in reduced gain for developing breeding stock and fed cattle as well as reduced milk production for cows. Confounding things further, cattle to tend eat less by simply avoiding putting in effort to get to feed.

Optimizing Ventilation in Small Scale Production

The environment inside our livestock and poultry houses is important for maintaining a productive and healthy herd or flock. Ventilation or fresh air exchange is important to remove undesirable moisture and noxious gases during winter months and in summer, make sure the indoor temperature is not too much warmer than outdoors.

Flood Recovery for Pastures

Flood waters are receding, but the challenges in recovery for farmers and livestock producers are just beginning. Beth Doran, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach beef specialist, recommends producers get out in their fields as soon as possible. "Beef producers should assess the damage to pastures and hay ground, then check out possible disaster assistance," she said. Doran advised cattlemen to look for three things in their assessment - debris, silt on the forage, and thinned or dead forage plants.

Take Action Against External Parasites and Pests in Poultry

Whether a producer keeps a few poultry birds or several thousand, common external parasites such as fleas, ticks, lice and mites can be devastating. Left unchecked, parasites can spread throughout a flock, causing economic loss and unnecessary suffering by the infected birds. Fortunately, the signs of a parasite infestation are often easy to detect, and there are a wide variety of products available for treatment.

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