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Flooding in Vegetable Fields

With respect to vegetable crops, recent flooding in western Iowa has created a tough situation for growers. Given the time of the year of this catastrophic event, there were no vegetable crops standing in the field, however, water/runoff from surface waters such as rivers, lakes, or steams could have overflowed and run into fields. This water most likely could contain chemical and biological contaminants that may be harmful to the health of humans and animals. 

Technology to Make Life Easier in the Field

Connected devices are becoming the norm in households including everything from outlets and switches to light bulbs and sensors for water leaks. The horticulture industry has not been left out of the connected devices revolution. New irrigation and climate controllers offer remote management from your phone or tablet giving you the ability to irrigate a field or close up a high tunnel from anywhere with internet or cellular connection.

Iowa Master Conservationist Program

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach will offer the Iowa Master Conservationist Program starting May 21. The program will take place at different locations within Hamilton, Humboldt, Webster and Wright Counties, providing participants with hands-on interaction showing the diversity of the state's natural resources. The program teaches about Iowa's natural ecosystems and the diversity of conservation challenges and opportunities within the region. 

Flood Recovery for Pastures

Flood waters are receding, but the challenges in recovery for farmers and livestock producers are just beginning. Beth Doran, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach beef specialist, recommends producers get out in their fields as soon as possible. "Beef producers should assess the damage to pastures and hay ground, then check out possible disaster assistance," she said. Doran advised cattlemen to look for three things in their assessment - debris, silt on the forage, and thinned or dead forage plants.

Take Action Against External Parasites and Pests in Poultry

Whether a producer keeps a few poultry birds or several thousand, common external parasites such as fleas, ticks, lice and mites can be devastating. Left unchecked, parasites can spread throughout a flock, causing economic loss and unnecessary suffering by the infected birds. Fortunately, the signs of a parasite infestation are often easy to detect, and there are a wide variety of products available for treatment.

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2018 Farmland Value Survey

The 2018 farmland value survey results are in! The survey is intended to provide information on general land value trends, geographical land price relationships, and factors influencing the Iowa land market. The survey is conducted by the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development in the Department of Economics at Iowa State University and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

Hollow Stem in Broccoli

In Iowa broccoli is typically planted early to mid-April and harvested mid-to-late June. Given the time of harvest it is often challenging to preserve the quality of broccoli in open fields. One of the major challenges growers face with broccoli is the ‘hollow stem’.

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