Grant Dewell

Extension Beef Veterinarian and Associate Professor

515-294-2822
515-509-4937
gdewell@iastate.edu

Articles by this author

Guidelines for choosing the correct vaccination program and a timeline for giving those vaccines are laid out in a new Iowa State University Extension and Outreach publication.

By: Grant Dewell

In an effort to protect human and animal health from the rise of antibiotic resistance, the Food and Drug Administration has issued new guidelines that will regulate medically important antibiotic use in animal feed.

By: Grant Dewell and Chris Rademacher and Yuko Sato

With the temperature warming up early this year mud is going to persist in cattle lots and pastures throughout the spring. For spring calving operations mud can be deadly.

By: Grant Dewell

The rapid and extreme increase in temperatures may be an unwelcome change for some cattle.

By: Grant Dewell and Sherry Hoyer

A new Iowa State University Extension and Outreach publication titled “Vaccines: Handle with Care” walks readers through procedures that can help keep vaccines safe while waiting to be used.

By: Grant Dewell

The USDA-NOAA heat stress forecast indicates that heat stress conditions will be elevated this weekend. Although conditions are not going to be severe, the entire state will be under a high heat warning on Saturday and Sunday. Temperatures this warm, early in the year before cattle have a chance to acclimate may cause some issues.

By: Grant Dewell

The Iowa Beef Center and ISU Extension and Outreach have developed the "Calving Management Manual" to cover issues critical to proper care prior to and at calving to reduce incidence of dystocia and minimize deleterious impacts should dystocia occur.

By: Grant Dewell

Feedlot cattle may not be acclimated to summer temperatures yet and the fast warm up this weekend may cause some heat stress issues. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach beef veterinarian Grant Dewell offers timely reminders for producers.

 

By: Grant Dewell

Temperatures in the upper 90s and elevated humidity may cause feedlot cattle some heat stress issues.

By: Grant Dewell

Each species of livestock reacts to heat differently. However, the common principle is to maintain good ventilation, provide shade and access to clean, cool water, and limit moving animals during the hottest hours of the day.

By: Chris Kick and Jason Ross and Grant Dewell and Jennifer Bentley