Environment

Local Highlights

April 8, 2020

Most Iowa State University Extension and Outreach events throughout the state March 16 through May 31 have been canceled. When possible, some activities may be conducted virtually using video or teleconferencing.  For information on specific events, please contact the ISU Extension and Outreach Fayette County Office. ISU Extension and Outreach is still open for business, said John D. Lawrence, vice president for extension and outreach. Although the Fayette County Office is closed to the public, leave a message and someone will get back to you as quickly as possible.   “Our goal is to do our part to reduce the spread of COVID-19, a disease caused by the new coronavirus, by eliminating large gatherings and practicing social distancing,” Lawrence said.  “The health and safety of Iowans is our greatest concern. We all have to do our part and be willing to change our plans for the greater good. We will get through this,” Lawrence said.

April 8, 2020

Social distancing, self-isolation, quarantine: the changes from COVID-19 can be hard to handle. However, Iowans can turn to Iowa Concern for help, says Tammy Jacobs, coordinator for the long-time service from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.  With a toll-free phone number, live chat capabilities and a website, Iowa Concern services are available 24 hours a day, seven days per week at no charge. Iowa Concern provides access to stress counselors and an attorney for legal education, as well as information and referral services for a wide variety of topics.

October 30, 2019

The butterfly is the featured highlight of the 2020 Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Garden Calendar, available for purchase through the ISU Extension Store , and at the Fayette County Extension Office, 218 South Main in Fayette. This 12-month calendar showcases the beauty and importance of this colorful, welcome visitor to backyards and gardens across Iowa.
 

October 30, 2019

Farmers and landowners who want to increase pollinator habitat while also improving water quality should consider the benefits of saturated riparian buffers enhanced with native wildflowers. Establishing pollinator habitat within riparian zones, where the agricultural value is lower and where the conservation and wildlife benefits are likely high, can be a win-win.
 

Agriculture and Natural Resources has many resources to help Iowans. Get a list of them all here.

Statewide Resources

  • Tree identification, care and maintenance, and timber management resources.

  • Educating people about Iowa's wildlife resources so that Iowans can make informed decisions that impact wildlife and their habitats.

  • Publications and resources covering fish farming to pond management.

  • Establishing watershed groups in impaired sub-watersheds throughout Iowa implemented through partnerships of farmers, extension specialists, Iowa State University Extension and agencies at the state and local level.

  • Providing Iowans with an independent, authoritative voice on water resource issues affecting Iowa.

  • Building institutional partnerships and increasing the capacity of citizens, educators, agencies and community leaders to better address water quality concerns.

  • A management approach for environmental enhancement of intensively modified agricultural landscapes.

  • Iowa Learning Farms is building a Culture of Conservation, calling attention to the importance of improved water and soil quality through conservation farming practices.

  • Research-based information and current Extension and Research projects on tillage and cropping systems, soil carbon sequestration, residue management, and cover crops.

  • Developing new ways to farm profitably while conserving natural resources.

  • Information on Pesticide Applicator Training, Integrated Pest Management, and related environmental programs.

  • Comprehensive information on manure management, research and application for Iowa.

  • Providing extension services on topics such as water quality and pollution control, hydrology and drainage, and remote sensing and modeling.

  • The Iowa Soil and Land Use site provides data related to the agricultural and non-agricultural uses of Iowa land to help you determine the right use for your soil.

  • Find resources on soil nutrients, nutrient management, soil sampling and testing, interpretations and recommendations.

  • Specialists have compiled a list of resources to help you prepare for and recover from natural disasters. Remember to take care of yourself and your family first; then deal with the things lost to the disaster.

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