Sarah Francis
Food Science and Human Nutrition

515-294-1456
slfranci@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

The spring 2014 Current Issues in Nutrition conference examines food safety concerns and what safe food really means. The online conference for nutrition and health professionals is organized by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach and the ISU Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition.

People have many motivations for choosing particular foods, but the most common reason is taste. That’s why the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is recommending that Americans “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right” during March, National Nutrition Month.

The heart isn’t the only organ that benefits from following a heart-healthy diet. The brain also benefits, which is important to remain strong and independent throughout life, says Sarah Francis, an Iowa State University assistant professor and ISU Extension and Outreach nutrition specialist.

Want to be trendy in 2014? Then eat more kale. This dark leafy green vegetable is considered to be a “nutritional powerhouse” and is high on the list of nutrition trends for the new year, said Sarah Francis, an Iowa State University assistant professor and ISU Extension and Outreach nutrition specialist.

Adults age 65 or older are eligible for free nutrition assessments on Senior Day, July 17, at the Adams County Fair. Iowa State University researchers will conduct the assessments using new measurement tools for detecting malnutrition.

Spring begins the farmers’ market season across Iowa. As Iowans seek fresh produce and support local growers, they should follow general guidelines to make sure locally-grown food is safe to eat, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach specialists say.

During the Quad County Health Fair, 36 older Iowans participated in Iowa State University nutritional assessments for people age 65 and older. Using new measurement tools that detect malnutrition in older adults, an Iowa State research team identified five of these Iowans as at risk for malnutrition.

Americans are being encouraged to personalize their eating style during National Nutrition Month. This campaign from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics focuses on making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.

Lifestyle changes, like eating a low-sodium diet and being physically active, can help reduce high blood pressure, also known as hypertension, or maintain blood pressure at a healthy level. February is National Heart Month and a good time to take action against this risk factor for heart attack and stroke, says an Iowa State University Extension and Outreach nutrition specialist.

January marks the start of a new Live Healthy Iowa 10 Week Challenge. The team-based weight loss and physical activity program is adding two new features to increase individual awareness of nutrition and physical activity behaviors and to provide research-based education on general nutrition topics.