Richard Jauron
Extension Horticulturist

515-294-3108
rjauron@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

Fall is an excellent time to reap the benefits of home gardens. Produce harvested from personal plots can make for a bountiful feast. But storing and keeping produce including potatoes, onions and carrots fresh can become an issue.

Fall is a perfect time to prepare lawns for the upcoming year with seeding, aeration and fertilization.

Peonies are a beautiful part of any landscape, and they thrive in Iowa. However, they do require some special care and conditions, and can develop problems which must be addressed.

Pears are a delicious part of any garden landscape, and they can be grown in Iowa. Multiple cultivars are acceptable for use in Iowa, although they differ slightly regarding harvesting and storage.

Summer is prime time for being outdoors, enjoying lawns and landscapes and making the most of the warmest months of the year. Crabgrass can ruin some of that fun by damaging a landscape’s appearance and overall feel.

Garden phlox is a beautiful way to add color to the garden in perennial fashion. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach horticulturists can help answer questions regarding garden phlox and keep it a valuable part of the garden landscape.

Many people love tomatoes from the garden, fresh and delicious. But diseases that attack them and limit their potential are no fun to deal with. ISU Extension and Outreach horticulturists can help solve these issues and ensure a big garden tomato crop.

Summer squash is a popular garden crop in Iowa, but problems can pop up that limit its success and hinder its overall growth. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach horticulturists can help solve these issues and create a bountiful harvest.

Blueberries require some special care and watering to maximize their potential. ISU Extension and Outreach horticulturists can help figure out how to get the most of blueberries for a bountiful, sweet harvest.

As homeowners enjoy the shade from their maple trees, they may notice something strange on the leaves or branches. Horticulturists from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach answer questions about galls, fungi and scale that may appear on maples.