Richard Jauron
Extension Horticulturist

515-294-3108
rjauron@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

February has brought unusually warm temperatures across Iowa, with record highs topping the 70-degree mark. However, it won’t last forever. Winter temperatures will return, but that could confuse trees, shrubs and plants which flower earlier than normal. Will this cause problems?

Winter 2017 has been unusually mild in Iowa, with daily high temperatures in the 50s and 60s and approaching record highs. This is good news for those who dislike snow and icy conditions, but it can confuse spring-flowering bulbs and lead to early growth. 
 

Winter weather still rules Iowa’s landscape these days, but spring isn’t far off on the horizon. It’s time to think about spring flowers and getting a head start by starting tubers indoors. It’s an excellent way to get plants growing even ahead of the final frost. 

There are several ways to propagate a tree or plant on a new landscape. While planting trees, shrubs or vines directly is one option, another is using hardwood stem cuttings to promote new growth with help from the previous growing season.

Soon it will be time for apple trees to bloom and bear delicious fruit for all to enjoy. But not all apple trees are fruitful. Why are some trees more productive than others? There are several reasons worth exploring.

With winter’s cold and ice here, spring planting might not exactly be front-of-mind. But this is a perfect time to get a jump start on spring by germinating and starting seedlings indoors, which later can be transplanted outside for optimal growth during warmer weather.

Winter can be a drab time for those who enjoy colorful landscapes. Freezing temperatures and the natural life cycles of plants lead to some drab, boring colors compared to spring, summer and fall. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

Winter is here, and the weather outside is cold and unhospitable for many plants and trees. However, it’s a great time to begin new indoor-friendly plants and trees that can benefit from warmer indoor temperatures and winter sunlight.

Christmas trees and poinsettias are popular, colorful additions to homes during the holiday season. But what happens to them when the holidays are over? Are they thrown to the curb or stuffed in a trash can? They don’t have to be.

Winter is here, and with it comes inclement, icy, snowy weather. Many Iowans use deicing salts to rid their properties of snow and ice, and deicing trucks and snowplows also spread chemicals on roads and streets. But these chemicals can have a negative effect on landscape plants.