J. Gordon Arbuckle Jr.
Sociology

515-294-1497
arbuckle@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

The 2015 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll asked farmers about their willingness to consider planting milkweed and other wildflowers to help improve monarch habitat in the state. Forty-two percent responded that they would consider planting or improving monarch habitat on their land. 

The 2015 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll asked farmers why, despite long-term efforts from state and federal governments, land grant universities, farmer groups and others, agriculture still has soil erosion and water quality impairment issues.

Understanding what motivates farmers to implement soil and water conservation practices was a goal of the 2015 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll.

Practices and strategies that minimize nutrient loss and soil erosion and increase soil health can have positive impacts on water quality while maintaining and improving productivity. The 2015 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll found that many farmers have increased their use of key practices in recent years.

Farmers’ perspectives on soil health is a focus of the 2015 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll.

When Iowa farmers believe the benefits of planting cover crops outweigh the risks, they’re more likely to adopt this practice, new Iowa State University research shows.

Farming has become increasingly complex, and farmers must consider many factors as they weigh decisions about planting and fertilizing, pest and disease management and soil and water conservation. As they gather information and advice to make decisions, farmers rely on a variety of professional advisers to varying degrees, according to the 2014 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll.

Farmers are increasing their use of information technology devices and accessing information to help with farming decisions, according to the 2014 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll.

The Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll: 2014 Summary Report indicates that fewer than half of the farmers surveyed have identified successors for their farm operations.

According to the latest Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll, the majority of farmers are aware of and support Iowa’s Nutrient Reduction Strategy, a science and technology-based approach used to assess and reduce nutrients delivered to Iowa waterways, the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico.