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Northwest Iowa Crops Page
by Todd Vagts
ISU Extension Crops Specialist
Counties Served:  Carroll, Calhoun, Crawford, Ida, Monona, Pocahontas and Sac.

[Home]Newsletter 2005 ] Field and Feedlot ] Stakeholder Report ] Soybean Aphid ] Soybean Rust ] Special Topics ] Crop Modeling ] Weather Data ] Yield Trials ] IA Crop Stats ] Subsoil H20 ][ISU Extension][IA State University]

Spring 2002 Subsoil Moisture Survey Results

  • Counties:  Carroll, Calhoun, Sac, Crawford, Monona and Ida
  • Date Sampled:  April 5, 2002

Most sampling areas picked up 2 to 3 inches of plant available water (PAW) over the winter and spring months when compared to the fall samples.  Soil moisture status remains variable across the region.  Subsoil moisture status ranges from a low of 2.0 inches (17 % soil capacity) plant available water under an alfalfa field in Monona County to 11.0 inches PAW (91% soil capacity) under a soybean field in Sac County.  On average across sampling locations, this is the best spring soil moisture condition the region has had since the spring of 1999. 

Carroll, Sac, Ida and Pocahontas counties have the best soil moisture profiles, averaging 9.2 inches of plant available water in the top 5-feet.  This is an average of 78% of the soilís total holding capacity.  Ida County had the greatest increase in soil moisture over the winter; adding 4 inches (PAW) to the soil profile.  On the other hand, Monona, Crawford and Calhoun counties need substantial spring rains to replenish the soil moisture profile.  These 3 counties have an average of 4.7 inches (PAW), which is 40% of the soils holding capacity.  The soil profile in the driest counties needs to be recharged in the 3 to 5 foot depth level.

Graphs
Detailed Excel worksheet

County

Township

Site

Soil

Previous
Crop

Sample Date

Plant Available
Water (5 ft)

Inches %

Carroll

Washington

Heinen

Marshall

Soybean

4/5/02 9.5 77

Crawford

Paradise

Steffen

Monona

Corn

4/5/02 4.6 39

Crawford

Paradise

Steffen

Monona

Soybean

4/5/02 5.5 47

Ida

Grant

Schug

Monona

Corn

4/5/02 8.2 70

Ida

Maple

Goodenow

Marshall

Corn

4/5/02 8.2 66

Ida

Griggs

Parker

Galva

Corn

4/5/02 11.1 90

Monona

Center

WIRF

Monona

Soybean

4/5/02 4.5 39

Monona

Center

WIRF

Monona

Corn

4/5/02 5.5 47

Monona

Center

WIRF

Monona

Alfalfa

4/5/02 2.0 17

Sac

Richland

Buehler

Primghar

Corn

4/5/02 9.6 78

Sac

Eurek

Riniger

Galva

Soybean

4/5/02 11.3 91

Sac

Jackson

Berry

Clarion

Corn

4/5/02 8.9 81

Sac

Sac

Graber

Canisteo

Soy bean

4/5/02 7.6 78

Sac

Wheeler

Wilken

Marshall

Corn

4/5/02 8.9 72

Pocahontas

Roosevelt

Reigelsberger

Nicollett

Corn

4/5/02 8.8 80
Calhoun Elm Grove Finley Nicollett Soybean 4/5/02 5.9 53

Graphs
Detailed Excel worksheet

Todd Vagts
Iowa State University Extension
Field Crops Specialist
1240 D. Heires Avenue 
Carroll, IA 51401 
Office: 712-792-2364; Cell: 712-249-6025;  Fax: 712-792-2366
Email: vagts@iastate.edu  

 

This page last updated on 01/26/05

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

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