Iowa State University
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Staff

 

Wildlife Extension
339 Science II
Iowa State University
Ames, IA 50011-3221

Phone: 515-294-7429
christof@iastate.edu

Rebecca Christoffel

I serve as the Wildlife Extension Specialist at Iowa State University.  My Extension programming focuses on increasing the capacities of Iowa’s citizens to make informed decisions regarding wildlife and their management.  Two Extension programs that I administer which are aimed at building this capacity include Master Conservationist program and Iowa NatureMapping.

Degrees
:

B.S., Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1993.
M.S., Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1998.
Ph.D., Fisheries & Wildlife, Michigan State University, 2007.

Research:

  • Plant-Ungulate interactions: techniques to moderate high density ungulate effects on forest structure and composition

  • I am a trans-disciplinary researcher, who is most interested in the integration of ecological and sociological data to inform natural resource management decisions and actions. In the past, I have conducted a number of small-scale, ecological studies on rare amphibians and reptiles. As a Master’s student, my research integrated ecological and sociological aspects of white-tailed deer management. My current research interests include the impacts of increasing human-wildlife interactions and conflicts to wildlife management and conservation, participatory natural  resource management including the roles of outreach and communication in such efforts, risk perception and analysis in conservation, and impacts of personal networks and community-level factors on individual beliefs, attitudes and behaviors associated with natural resources.

Peer Reviewed Publications:

Lepczyk, C.A., Christoffel, R.A. and D.T. Rutledge. In revision. “Does size matter? Human perceptions of species endangerment.” Ecology Letters

Genet, K.S., Lepczyk, C.A., Christoffel, R., Sargent, L.G., and T.M. Burton. 2008. “Using volunteer monitoring programs for anuran onservation along a rural-urban gradient in southern Michigan.” In J.C. Mitchell, R.E. Jung, and B. Bartholomew (eds.), Urban Herpetology, Herpetological Conservation 3:563-572. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Salt Lake City, UT.

Christoffel, R.A., Felix, A., Kramer, D. and N. Lamp. 2008. “Applying an adaptive management framework to an experiential field course in Fisheries and Wildlife.” The Wildlife Professional 2(2):45-47.

Christoffel, R.A. 2008. Book review. “Intelligent Courage: Natural Resource Careers that Make a Difference.” Human Dimensions of Wildlife 13:301-302.

Christoffel, R.A. 2008. Book review. “Mean and Lowly Things: Snakes, Science and Survival in the Congo.” Bulletin of Chicago Herp. Society 43(12):196.

Christoffel, R.A. and S.R. Craven. 2000. Woodland owners’ attitudes toward white-tailed deer and herbivory in Wisconsin. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 28(1):227-234.


Extension Publications:

Christoffel, R., R.Hay and M. Monroe. 2002. Turtles and Lizards of Wisconsin, PUB-ER-104, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, Wisconsin.

Christoffel, R., R. Hay and M. Wolfgram. 2001. Amphibians of Wisconsin, PUB-ER-105, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, Wisconsin.

Christoffel, R., D. Covell, S. Craven and R. Ruff. 2000. How to inventory and monitor wildlife on your land, PUBL-WM-294-00, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, Wisconsin.

Christoffel, R., R. Hay and L. Ramirez. 2000. Snakes of Wisconsin, PUB-ER-100, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, Wisconsin.