Campylobacter Jejuni

What is Campylobacter jejuni?

Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial diarrhea in the United States. Although anyone can have a C. jejuni infection, children under five years and young adults (15-29) are more frequently affected than other age groups. Symptoms of diarrhea, fever and vomitting usually occur two to five days after ingestion of the contaminated food or water.

C. jejuni is frequently found in raw chicken. Raw milk is also a source of infection, since the bacteria are often carried by healthy cattle and flies on farms.
Non-chlorinated water may also be a source of contamination. Cook chicken properly and purchase pasterized milk and chlorinated drinking water.

More Information on Campylobacter jejuni:


  • Article History
    • Revision Date: 6/22/2010

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Improper handling of raw meat, poultry, and seafood can create an inviting environment for cross-contamination. As a result, bacteria can spread to food and and other surfaces throughout the kitchen. Keeping uncooked meat, poultry, and seafood away from ready-to-eat foods like fruits, vegetables, and cold cuts helps prevent pathogens and other bacteria from contaminating the ready-to-eat foods.

Source: Partnership for Food Safety Education

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