SafeFood Lesson 1 Page 4

Introduction Lesson 1
What's
bugging
you?
Lesson 2
What are
Consumer
Control
Points?
Lesson 3
Where is the
DANGER
ZONE?
Lesson 4
Who is
FAT TOM?

Contact
Glossary
References


See also:
Common Foodborne Pathogens Food Safety Lessons Introduction Lesson One: Whats Bugging You? Lesson Two: What are Consumer Control Points? Lesson Three: Where is the Danger Zone? Lesson Four: Who is FAT TOM? Glossary of Terms Food Safety References Contact the Food Safety Project Team

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Lesson One: What's bugging you?
(continued)


Why are microorganisms important?
Microorganisms are everywhere. You may not see, taste, or smell them, but they hide on your body, in the air, on kitchen counters and utensils, and in food. The main microorganisms are viruses, parasites, fungi and bacteria.
 

Viruses are the tiniest, and probably the simplest, form of life. They are not able to reproduce outside a living cell yet can survive for a period of time even on inanimate objects, such as door handles. Once they enter a cell, they force it to make more viruses.

Some viruses are extremely resistant to heat and cold. They don’t need potentially hazardous food to survive. Once in the food, they don’t multiply. The food is mainly a transportation device to get from one host to another. Hepatitis A and norovirus have been identified as the cause of many foodborne illness outbreaks.

virus.gif (6829 bytes)

Once in the human, viruses reproduce quickly and may cause disease


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Copyright 1997-2007 Food Safety and Quality Project, Iowa State University Extension