William Edwards
Department of Economics

515-294-6161
wedwards@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

Rental rates for Iowa farmland decreased moderately in 2014 according to results from a survey carried out by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. This is the first decrease shown by the annual survey since 1999. The cash rental rates survey results are available in the ISU Extension and Outreach publication Cash Rental Rates for Iowa 2014 Survey.

The 2014 Iowa Farm Custom Rate Survey followed the recent trend of small, but consistent increases in rates each year. The survey is available at your county extension office, from the Extension Online Store or on the Ag Decision Maker website.

The frequent rains that have soaked Iowa this year have left many corn and soybean fields unplanted or with flooded areas. Many producers are wondering what options they have under their multiple peril crop insurance policies. Beginning June 1, corn producers with unplanted acres have three choices.

Results from the most recent survey of farmland rental rates conducted by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach showed that the average estimated cash rent for corn and soybean land in the state for 2013 was $270 per acre, an increase of $18 per acre or 7 percent from last year.

The 2013 Iowa Farm Custom Rate Survey is now available to download from the Extension Online Store or the Ag Decision Maker website as Information File A3-10, Iowa Farm Custom Rate Survey. Print copies will be available at county extension offices. 

Livestock producers who established a cover crop after corn harvest last fall are wondering how this will affect their crop insurance coverage for 2013, according to William Edwards, economist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

Drought damage is an insurable loss under multiple peril crop insurance, which covers nearly 90 percent of the corn and soybean acres in Iowa.  Producers should consult with their crop insurance agents before harvesting or destroying any drought-damaged crops. 

Anyone who is involved with the rental market for Iowa farmland knows that rental rates have been pushed significantly higher by the favorable corn and soybean prices that farmers have enjoyed since 2010. This trend continued in 2012.

The Risk Management Agency (USDA) has some specific rules about early planted crops with regard to crop insurance coverage. For each insurable crop RMA has set an “early planting date.” Acres planted before these dates are no longer eligible for replant coverage payments should it be necessary to replant them.

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach and Iowa Farm Bureau Federation will address crop insurance and marketing decisions for farmers during a one-hour webinar Wednesday, Feb. 8.