Mark Hanna
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

515-294-0468
hmhanna@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

Researchers began collecting initial data last fall on university-owned farmland near Ames to quantify the impact of construction utilities equipment, field traffic and deep tillage on crop yield and soil compaction.

The costs associated with installing solar arrays have dropped over the last several years, making them much more cost effective to install on a farm or acreage. As they become more affordable, these solar arrays are becoming a viable source of energy for farmers, especially farmers who have large barns to ventilate in the summer or fans on grain bins.

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach specialists will be featured speakers at a central Iowa field day focused on strip-till technologies on Wednesday, July 13, at the Iowa State University Research Farm south of Ames.

A new publication, Farm Energy: Case Studies – Techniques to improve tractor energy efficiency and fuel savings, is now available for download in the Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Store.

As harvest approaches, propane is a key ingredient for anyone using a high-temperature system to dry corn. A case study conducted by Mark Hanna, agricultural and biosystems engineering specialist for Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, can help farmers as they plan for harvest and winter storage.

A new publication from ISU Extension and Outreach illustrates the results of the collaborative efforts of three ISU farms to measure the propane and electricity used for grain drying during the 2013 harvest season.

Tractor fuel expenses can add up quickly during fall and spring field work. Results of a tractor fuel case study measuring fuel consumption for field work including disking, plowing and planting now are available.

The expenses for tractor fuel can add up quickly during spring field work. According to a study conducted at the Iowa State University Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm near Nashua a twenty percent or more fuel savings can be achieved by the ‘shift up, throttle back’ technique.

As tractors, combines and other farm equipment have become larger and heavier, Iowa farmers’ concerns about soil compaction and its impacts on crop yields have increased as well, according to the 2013 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll.

The Iowa State University Farm Energy project will air its annual Farm Energy Webinar on June 25, from 10-11 a.m.