Margaret Smith
Value Added Agriculture Program

641-430-9241
mrgsmith@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

New research from Iowa State University shows that farmers should use the same level of management for small grains as they do when managing corn or soybeans. By using seed counts per acre when planting, instead of a “by the bushel” rate calculation, farmers can receive both yield and financial benefits.

Training farmers to manage and build their business is the goal of a new eight-week program offered to aspiring, new and established farmers.

ISU Extension and Outreach will use grant funds received from the USDA to develop and implement programs that support beginning and retiring farmers and military veterans interested in farming.

ISU Extension and Outreach is offering a specialized Annie's Project course on value added agriculture farm business plan development. The course, specifically for women, will be held in Ames.

The Iowa Organic Association and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Value Added Agriculture Program invite farmers to tour Grain Millers Inc., a small-grain processing facility located in St. Ansgar, Iowa, on Friday, Feb. 7. The tour and program take a look at the challenges organic farmers and food processors have finding providing organic commodities to meet increased demand for organic food.

In May 2011, Iowa farm women began sharing their experiences in central Africa, where 80 percent of the farming is done by women. The collaboration was developed by a farmer-to-farmer project through Iowa State University’s Value Added Agriculture program with cooperation from a Ugandan nonprofit organization, Volunteer Efforts for Developing Concerns (VEDCO).

A third group of volunteers traveled to Uganda in August this year as part of the rural development program, Bridging the Gap: Increasing Competitiveness of Ugandan Women Farmers in the Marketplace. This farmer-to-farmer program pairs Iowa women farmers with eight groups of women farmers in the Kamuli District of Uganda.

A second group of Iowa women traveled to Uganda as part of the rural development program, Bridging the Gap: Increasing Competitiveness of Ugandan Women Farmers in the Marketplace. This farmer-to-farmer program connects Iowa farmers with eight groups of women farmers in the Kamuli District of Uganda.

Iowa farm women are sharing their experiences in central Africa, where 80 percent of the farming is done by women. This collaboration was developed by a farmer-to-farmer project through Iowa State University Extension with cooperation from a Ugandan nonprofit organization.

Iowa women farmers have a rare opportunity to help women farmers in Uganda by volunteering to spend approximately two weeks working directly with smallholder farmers.