Lori Hayungs
Human Sciences Extension and Outreach

Family Life
712-360-1740
lhayungs@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

Teenagers may view getting a job simply as a way to earn money, and that’s a valid reason to work. However, employment may bring additional benefits to teens and perhaps a few concerns for their parents, say the Science of Parenting bloggers from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

The demands of parenting often are multiplied for parents of children with special health and behavioral needs, say the Science of Parenting bloggers from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. However, these parents will be better able to provide care for their children if they also take care of themselves.

Want kids to eat their vegetables and do better in school? Get them involved in gardening, say the Science of Parenting bloggers from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

Extending family time can be easy — just add food and fitness. Lori Hayungs, an Iowa State University Extension and Outreach human sciences specialist, offers the following tips on how to increase family time while encouraging children’s healthy development.

Many parents worry about what their children eat — and don’t eat. However, when parents and children engage in mealtime battles, nobody wins. Instead, parents should focus on preventing power struggles over food, say the Science of Parenting bloggers from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.
 

Many parents think they can hide financial stress from their children, but the kids always know – and they’re worried, too. Talking together openly about family finances is a better way to lower everyone’s stress level and also teach kids about money, say the Science of Parenting bloggers from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

When children don’t have time for household chores, it’s time to reevaluate their busy schedules, say the Science of Parenting bloggers from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

Children aren’t born knowing how to be kind or compassionate. However, these virtues can be taught, say the Science of Parenting bloggers from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

Do some kids have too much stuff? Are they overinvolved in sports or dance or other activities? Knowing how much is too much often may depend on whether children also are getting enough positive interaction with the adults in their lives, say the Science of Parenting bloggers from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

Eat better. Exercise more. Get organized. Learn something new. It’s that time of year when adults make resolutions to help them reach their goals. It’s also a good time for parents to help their children build goal-setting skills, say the Science of Parenting bloggers from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.