Kimberly Greder
Human Development and Family Studies

515-294-5906
kgreder@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

The Human Sciences Extension and Outreach specialist and associate professor at Iowa State University has been selected to receive the North Central Region Excellence in Extension award.  Greder will receive the award in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, Nov. 9.

The Science of Parenting’s next webinar will air on July 9 from 12 to 1 p.m. The webinar will focus on children, sports and competition, and is part of Iowa State University’s electronic outreach to parents.

Since 2004, Iowa State University has been participating in a multi-state study to research the health and well-being of rural families who have low incomes and young children. ISU Extension and Outreach researchers are specifically examining the health and well-being of Latino immigrant families in Iowa, and have recently published findings regarding families’ ability to understand their new food environments and children’s eating practices.

Poverty statistics have climbed during the past decade, and food insecurity rates have increased across Iowa and the nation as a whole. Researchers from Iowa State University have assembled the latest data on these issues in a series of publications, now available online.

Any parent, new or seasoned, may have questions regarding his or her children. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach offers a free monthly newsletter, Just in Time Parenting, with helpful information on parenting young ones.

Relational aggression in children is another way of saying that kids can be mean to one another. Parents may not be able to stop this bullying, but they can help their children learn how to deal with the behavior, says Kimberly Greder, an extension specialist and associate professor of human development and family studies at Iowa State University.

Kids can be mean — whether on the elementary school playground or in the middle school hallway or high school cafeteria. Learn how parents can deal with this meanness, called relational aggression, in this month’s Science of Parenting podcast.

Parents, according to a new survey from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), your toddler could be watching too much television. A new policy report from the AAP says there are better ways to help children learn at this young age.

There’s a reason that kids act like zombies sometimes, and it’s all in their brains. Children’s brains keep changing from birth through the teen years and into early adulthood. Learn how parents can help those young brains develop — listen to this month’s Science of Parenting podcast.
 

Parents need to know what their kids are watching on television and steer them toward the “good stuff.” The trick is determining what the good stuff is. That’s the topic of this month’s Science of Parenting podcast from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.