J. Gordon Arbuckle Jr.
Sociology

515-294-1497
arbuckle@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

The Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy sets ambitious goals for keeping agricultural nutrients out of the state’s waterways. To reach the reduction targets, Iowa farmers and their advisers will have to work together to improve nutrient management strategies, according to a new Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll report.
 

As tractors, combines and other farm equipment have become larger and heavier, Iowa farmers’ concerns about soil compaction and its impacts on crop yields have increased as well, according to the 2013 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll.

Iowa farmers are well aware that populations of Bt-resistant corn rootworm have been found in the state, and more than half are concerned that the pest will become a major problem here, according to the 2013 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll.

Iowa farmers are increasingly concerned about herbicide-resistant weeds and are changing their weed management practices to deal with the issue, according to the 2013 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll.

Drought, extreme rains and flooding over the past five years have had the greatest influence on farmers’ beliefs about climate change, according to the 2013 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll. The survey also gathered farmers' concerns about weather-related threats to agriculture and attitudes regarding different types of potential responses to increasing weather variability.
 

Iowa’s farmers are substantially involved in philanthropy, donating their time and money to organizations, causes and charities they believe in, according to the Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll. Many rural communities are beginning to depend on these philanthropic efforts as an important part of local community and economic development.

To see if nonpoint source loan programs were making a difference, Iowa Clean Water State Revolving Fund staff contacted Iowa State University Extension and Outreach to help conduct an evaluation. Extension sociologist J. Gordon Arbuckle Jr. led the research team and results of the study have been published.

Iowa farmers rely primarily on agribusinesses, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach and state agencies for their information needs, according to the 2012 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll.

About 70 percent of farmers report using at least one technology that provides them with Internet access, according to the 2012 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll. In addition, a basic cell phone was the most common communications technology used by farmers in the survey.

Many farmers appear to believe that farmland is overvalued and eventually the market bubble will burst, according to the 2012 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll.