Greg Wallace
Organizational Advancement

515-294-1327
gwallace@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

Native plants can give home landscapes a unique, varied look when paired with the current flora and fauna that already dot landscapes across Iowa. Which are best for specific landscapes and gardens, and how should they be treated for best results?

Spring has finally sprung across Iowa, and with it, growing green grass on lawns everywhere. The hum of lawn mowers is beginning to fill the air, and that hum brings questions about proper mowing practices. 

Spring and warmer weather have arrived, and that means it’s time to think about planting annual flowers and vegetables in Iowa. 

The State Science and Technology Fair of Iowa's 59th annual edition March 31-April 1 brought together nearly 700 students and 150 teachers from across the state to display and discuss projects they’d worked very hard on throughout the past year.

With spring here, it’s time to think about planting peas. Multiple pea cultivars are a good fit in Iowa gardens, and April is prime time to give peas a chance in the garden. 

Feng Zhang has established himself as one of the most distinguished alums of the SSTFI. The former Des Moines resident and Roosevelt High School student has emerged as one of the world’s most impressive new scientific minds, thanks to his groundbreaking human genome research that could lead to solutions for a number of health problems that plague modern society.

Spring’s arrival brings thoughts of green grass, flowering trees and – potatoes. Yes, potatoes. The starchy, tuberous crop is an integral, delicious part of many diets. In Iowa, optimal planting season is fast approaching.

The Iowa Alpha Mu Chapter of Epsilon Sigma Phi, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach’s honor society, recognized three Friends of Extension and five ISU Extension and Outreach staff members from across the state  during Epsilon Sigma Phi’s annual awards ceremony March 8 at Gateway Hotel and Conference Center in Ames.

Cherries are a delicious fruit that can range from sweet to sour, but are always a treat. Can they be grown in Iowa? Absolutely.

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach partnered with the Small Business Development Center and the Iowa Black Business Coalition to create the Untraditional Start-A-Thon to give Iowa minority business owners a foothold and a boost.