Greg Wallace
Organizational Advancement

515-294-1327
gwallace@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

Spring is a time for renewal and growth, and it’s also an excellent time for new beginnings. Planting a new tree (or trees) is a great way to create a legacy that can last for generations on a landscape. However, planting trees requires specific care and steps to ensure a successful outcome.

A traditional home garden is a popular way to grow vegetables, but it’s far from the only way. Growing vegetable plants in containers can also produce a bountiful crop, although care must be taken to ensure meaningful growth. 

Raspberries are a delicious part of any home garden, and growing them can be rewarding. But care must be taken to ensure that they develop properly, grow disease-free and produce a bountiful harvest. 

Planting small fruits in gardens is a popular part of spring. But some need more support than others. When is it right to fertilize small fruits? Or should it be done at all?

Carrots are a great part of any garden vegetable crop and an excellent addition to a homegrown garden bounty. Where do you plant them? When is the best time? Which varieties work well in this climate? 

Spring is here, and hostas are a popular part of outdoor landscaping plans. They are easy to grow, but certain steps in planting and dividing them must be followed in order to ensure optimal performance.

Although snow is on the ground in much of Iowa, spring is upon us. It’s time to think about planting gardens, but before that happens, proper care must be taken to ensure the soil is ready for growth. That means fertilizing soil, testing it and, perhaps, applying materials like lime.

Spring planting season is upon us, and it’s time to think about how those gardens will be populated with vegetables that will yield a bountiful harvest later in the year. All vegetables have an optimal planting time that helps them properly mature and maximize their potential.

The calendar has flipped to March, and spring is just around the corner. In Iowa, of course, that doesn’t necessarily mean the end of freezing temperatures associated with a late-spring frost. Protecting plants from such events is important, but when should precautions be removed?

February has brought unusually warm temperatures across Iowa, with record highs topping the 70-degree mark. However, it won’t last forever. Winter temperatures will return, but that could confuse trees, shrubs and plants which flower earlier than normal. Will this cause problems?