Christa Hartsook
Communications Specialist, Value Added Agriculture Program

515-294-4430
hartc@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

An Iowa MarketReady training to help food suppliers succeed in today's markets will be April 10 at the Dubuque County Extension Office, 14858 West Ridge Lane, Dubuque.

Iowa MarketReady helps farm vendors selling dairy, fruits, meats and vegetables design a better business strategy to succeed. This two-day training will be  March 25 and March 27 in Waterloo.

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach offers classes designed for farm women with an interest in being better business partners and owners. Several different types of classes are being offered across the state during the coming year.

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach will host a series of meetings this February for fruit and vegetable growers on transplanting, advanced high tunnel tomato production, drip irrigation and water management, and invasive pest management.

Iowa MarketReady will help farm vendors selling dairy, fruits, meats and vegetables design a business strategy to succeed. This two-day training will be held Feb. 20 and March 6 in Cedar Rapids.

The Iowa Organic Association and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Value Added Agriculture Program invite farmers to tour Grain Millers Inc., a small-grain processing facility located in St. Ansgar, Iowa, on Friday, Feb. 7. The tour and program take a look at the challenges organic farmers and food processors have finding providing organic commodities to meet increased demand for organic food.

High tunnel bramble production will be offered as an educational track at the Iowa Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association’s annual conference Jan. 23-24 in Ankeny.

Agricultural producers applying for value-added producer grants can find resources to assist them through the Agricultural Marketing Resource Center at Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach will host a series of meetings this fall for growers producing crops in high tunnels. Two meeting sites will be offered for each workshop.

With this spring’s wet soils and cool, cloudy weather, some people wonder where those ripe tomatoes and green beans at the farmers' market are coming from. The growers may be using high tunnels that allow them to plant earlier and have vegetables a few to several weeks sooner than field-grown crops.