Charles Schwab
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

515-294-4131
cvschwab@iastate.edu

Articles by this author:

This is the time of year when oversized, tall equipment such as portable grain augers and combines are moved from place to place on the farmstead, ISU Extension and Outreach wants to remind everyone to look up and avoid contact with power lines to prevent farm injuries and deaths.

Sept.18-24 is National Farm Safety and Health Week, and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach wants farmers to focus their attention on potential slips and falls, which can be linked to serious injuries.

The Iowa Farm Safety and Health Week will be held Sept. 18-24 in conjunction with the National Farm Safety and Health Week. This year’s theme is “Farm Safety…A Legacy to be Proud Of."

During harvest time the Iowa Farm Safety Council strives to increase knowledge about agricultural hazards and dangers and to encourage Iowans to make better safety and health decisions.

Harvest is historically the most dangerous time of year for agriculture. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach wants to remind everyone to regularly read instruction manuals about potential dangers of farm equipment and to be diligent in preventing farm injuries.

During National Farm Safety and Health Week, Sept. 20-26, agriculture engineering experts at Iowa State University Extension and Outreach suggest farmers plan ahead for hazardous situations that may occur in confined spaces.

The Iowa Farm Safety and Health Week is being held in conjunction with the 71st annual National Farm Safety and Health Week, Sept. 21-27.

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach has a series of publications, titled “Safe Farm,” that contain valuable information on safe farming techniques and tips. 

More Iowa farmers are cutting corn for silage this summer due to the extreme heat, dryness and crop conditions. Because of the increased silage production, the possibilities for silo gas and related health issues have increased, according to Chuck Schwab, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach farm safety and health specialist.

Harvest is a prime time for agricultural fires, even when the weather has not been warm and dry. This year, the normal harvest dryness will be intensified because of the drought conditions and the potential for agricultural fires has increased above normal as well.