Allen Pattillo
ISU Extension Fisheries and Aquaculture

515-294-8616
pattillo@iastate.edu

 

Articles by this author:

A new bio-dome display at Iowa State University’s Reiman Gardens looks into the future of farming in space, as well as here on Earth. The bio-dome is the main attraction in the Hughes Conservatory through Nov. 15 as part of Reiman Gardens’ space and science fiction theme this year.

Having 2 percent of the total pond surface open throughout the winter will help pond owners avoid fish kills, according to ISU Extension and Outreach fisheries and aquaculture specialist Allen Pattillo.

Aquatic plants, although necessary for the pond ecosystem, can become a nuisance in ponds throughout Iowa during the hot summer months. Excessive plant growth can be managed through a variety of methods of varying cost and effectiveness.

A Webster City business, Iowa’s First, has taken a proactive approach to circumventing the economic losses in livestock production by moving into fish farming. Mark and Jeff Nelson are producing hybrid striped bass in their unused hog facility. With the assistance of ISU Extension and Outreach they hope to create an aquaculture hub in central Iowa.

Due to this summer's extreme heat and dry weather, many pond owners are having issues with submerged plants, floating plants and filamentous algae, which are leading them to using aquatic herbicides that may be problematic for fish. Pond owners have a couple of aeration options according to Allen Pattillo, extension aquaculture and fisheries specialist.

The warm, early spring weather soon will encourage vegetative growth in the nutrient-rich waters of Iowa ponds. Pond owners need to know that wherever there is sunlight, water and nutrients, there will be some sort of plant growing. Effective management involves manipulating one or more of these elements to reduce or eliminate aquatic plants.

Iowa State University Natural Resource Ecology and Management (NREM) specialists and faculty talked about physical, chemical and biological conditions of urban streams and the implications of daily actions by individuals with respect to stream health and sustainability during the Science Center of Iowa Cafe Scientifique. The program was recorded and is available online.

Members of the Iowa State University Natural Resource Ecology and Management Extension and Outreach team visited the Clay County Fair, showing off maple syrup production, Blanding's turtles and fishing skills.

Future scientist from the Science Center of Iowa visited the Iowa State campus on Aug. 11 to explore unique science careers. The seventh and eighth graders not only learned about careers, but the educational opportunities at Iowa State University.

Iowans wondering about getting into aquaculture as a business, those with concerns about their ponds and others who want to know more about Iowa's waterways or fish can now contact Allen Pattillo, the ISU Extension aquaculture and fisheries specialist.