Articles

This weekend about 100 Iowa youth of African heritage will be exploring how their cultural legacy shapes them as future leaders in their communities. They’ll be participating in Ujima, one of two youth leadership retreats offered by the Iowa State University Extension and Outreach 4-H Youth Development program.

Spring and warmer weather have arrived, and that means it’s time to think about planting annual flowers and vegetables in Iowa. 

The 89th annual Soil Management and Land Valuation Conference, the longest running conference at Iowa State University, will be held May 18 in the Scheman Building on the ISU campus.

Two Spring 2016 Beef Management Workshops are set for Warren and Madison counties in late May. The workshops will focus on new ideas in fescue usage, how marketplace factors will impact cow-calf producers, and antimicrobial resistance and other disease trends.

The annual “Update for Veterinarians” program features a full day of education and demonstrations focused on beef cattle. The event is May 24 at the Iowa State McNay Research Farm near Chariton.

Iowa 4-H youth will take advancement of agriculture one step further by solving a real-world agriculture challenge. They’ll be leading the kickoff "Honey Bee Challenge” during the Drake/Metro STEM event, Thursday, April 14 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Bell Center on the Drake University campus in Des Moines. The free event is open to the public.

As a human scientist, Christine Hradek is making healthy choices easier for families with low incomes by partnering with the ISU Extension and Outreach Master Gardener Program to put more fruits and vegetables into the food pantry system.

Five 4-H youth have been selected to represent Iowa at the National 4-H Conference April 9-14 in Washington, D.C. Anna Marie Ehlers, Buena Vista County; Elizabeth Nible and Victoria Smiley, Madison County; and Mallory Hammitt and Hannah Peterson, Webster County, will represent Iowa’s interests in the national 4-H program

The State Science and Technology Fair of Iowa's 59th annual edition March 31-April 1 brought together nearly 700 students and 150 teachers from across the state to display and discuss projects they’d worked very hard on throughout the past year.

Blueberries are attractive shrubs with flowers in spring, edible berries in summer and fall foliage in shades of yellow, orange and red. Blueberries can be grown in any home garden but there are some special growing needs that must be met.

Iowa Money Smart Week partners and the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago will be offering free financial seminars and special events April 23-30. Topics range from retirement planning to youth financial literacy, paying for college, home buying and investment options.

When children don’t have time for household chores, it’s time to reevaluate their busy schedules, say the Science of Parenting bloggers from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

The regular monthly Iowa Learning Farms webinar is Wednesday, April 20 at 1 p.m. This month’s guest speakers are Wren Almitra, Women, Land & Legacy coordinator, and Tanya Meyer-Dideriksen, NRCS area easement specialist.

One day of purple and an official month of recognition are simple ways to show support for Iowa’s military children and families whose sacrifices continue year round, say human sciences specialists with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

New research from Iowa State University shows that farmers should use the same level of management for small grains as they do when managing corn or soybeans. By using seed counts per acre when planting, instead of a “by the bushel” rate calculation, farmers can receive both yield and financial benefits.

With spring here, it’s time to think about planting peas. Multiple pea cultivars are a good fit in Iowa gardens, and April is prime time to give peas a chance in the garden. 

A new publication from ISU Extension and Outreach will help producers identify signs of scours so they can treat calves effectively and learn a variety of management methods to help minimize future problems.

Producers should monitor their herds for signs of hypomagnesaemia (grass tetany), be ready to treat it and work to minimize the causes of the disease, according to a new Iowa State University Extension and Outreach publication.

Feng Zhang has established himself as one of the most distinguished alums of the SSTFI. The former Des Moines resident and Roosevelt High School student has emerged as one of the world’s most impressive new scientific minds, thanks to his groundbreaking human genome research that could lead to solutions for a number of health problems that plague modern society.