Manure Management Short Course

Angela Rieck-Hinz, Extension Program Specialist, Agronomy

Situation 

Due to Iowa State University (ISU) Extension’s lead role in providing producer/client education in crop production and protection practices, our partner has grown dependent on ISU to provide educational opportunities to meet their program needs and the overwhelming amount of regulatory changes regarding manure nutrient management that have been implemented in Iowa in the past 12 months. A short course highlighting manure nutrient management issues and planning requirements was developed and offered to service providers and agency staff to help prepare for the workload faced by producers in the near future to meet regulatory requirements.

Objective

The objective was to identify educational needs of service providers and agency staff to meet requirements faced by producers for nutrient management planning efforts to meet either 1) state or federal cost-share eligibility, or 2) state regulatory requirements for manure nutrient management planning and to develop and implement training to meet those educational needs.

Activities/Output

Outputs included developing a curriculum for a 3-day short course to meet the training needs of participants. This curriculum included subject modules ranging from basic soil fertility concepts to complicated planning processes for both nutrient management and erosion predictions. Specific outputs included a notebook of teaching materials containing existing Extension fact sheets and new materials designed for this course, 8 PowerPoint presentations, specific worksheets for field demonstrations, software downloads and an evaluation of the program.

Impact/Outcomes  

Seventy people attended this short course. Evaluations from those participants indicated that the majority of participants were exposed to planning processes such as RUSLE 2, the P-index calculator, and new manure management planning forms for the first time and can now employ the specific skills needed to use those tools and understand how those tools will be required to be implemented for nutrient management planning in Iowa. Many participants said they will be using these tools to refine or expand the services offered to their clients and to grow their businesses. Participants also stated that impact of the knowledge gained and the practices employed will help crop and livestock producers meet regulatory requirements, maintain eligibility for cost-share dollars and over time will help producers meet crop production goals.

 

2005   
103 -- Nutrient Management

Page last updated: July 8, 2006
Page maintained by Linda Schultz, lschultz@iastate.edu