Skip Navigation

8/29/2011 - 9/4/2011

Soil Management Clinic Offered Sept. 14

By Brent Pringnitz, Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources

Soil management and conservation is vital to the long-term success of any crop production system. Understanding and implementing successful soil management practices is the focus of the Iowa State University Soil Management Clinic on Sept. 14. Held at the Field Extension Education Laboratory (FEEL) west of Ames, the clinic will offer a combination of classroom and field activities concentrating on soil properties and tillage effects.

Tom Fenton, ISU professor of agronomy, will speak on understanding soil properties and field variability. Mahdi Al-Kaisi, ISU Extension soil and water management specialist, will cover soil quality measurements and conservation practices. Mark Hanna, ISU extension agricultural engineer, will lead field activities and discussions about soil-machine interactions, compaction and residue management.

Pre-registration by midnight Sept. 9 is required to attend this class; registration can be made online at www.aep.iastate.edu/feel/soils.html. Registration is $150 and includes lunch, breaks and class notebook. This program is approved for 5.0 soil and water management credits for Certified Crop Advisers.


For information about this and other courses offered by ISU Crops Extension and Outreach, please visit www.aep.iastate.edu or call (515) 432-9548.

 


Brent Pringnitz is coordinator of Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Program Services and can be reached at (515) 432-9548 or bpring@iastate.edu.

Corn Disease Diagnostics Clinic Sept. 8

By Brent Pringnitz, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension

Corn diseases can have a serious impact on crop yield. Understanding the conditions in which these diseases thrive, correctly identifying the disease and knowing appropriate treatment measures are important tools to protecting crop yield.

On Sept. 8, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is offering a Corn Disease Diagnostics Clinic at the Field Extension Education Laboratory (FEEL) west of Ames. The clinic combines classroom and field activities focused on diagnosing, understanding and managing a wide variety of diseases affecting corn.

Guest instructor Tamra Jackson, University of Nebraska, will focus on the arrival of Goss's wilt in Iowa. Alison Robertson, ISU extension crop plant pathologist, will discuss stalk, leaf and ear diseases and their diagnosis. The topic of nematodes affecting corn will be covered by Greg Tylka, ISU extension nematologist.

Pre-registration by midnight Sept. 5 is required to attend this class. Register online by that date. Registration is $150 and includes lunch, breaks and class notebook. This program is approved for 5.5 pest management credits for Certified Crop Advisers.

Learn more about this and other courses offered by ISU Crops Extension and Outreach at www.aep.iastate.edu or call (515) 432-9548.

 

Brent Pringnitz is coordinator of Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Program Services. He can be reached at bpring@iastate.edu or 515-432-9548.

Webinar to Address Flood Recovery for Cropland

By Clarke McGrath, extension field agronomist and Shawn Shouse, extension ag engineer

As waters recede from farmland that has been covered for several months by Missouri River flooding, Iowa State University (ISU) Extension and Outreach and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) Extension are jointly planning a workshop for Monday, Sept. 12 to address cropland issues. The workshop will be conducted via webinar at several viewing sites in both states from 9:30 a.m. to noon. Extension agriculture staff will host the workshop sites and facilitate questions to the panel.

Topics to be covered during the webinar and extension presenters include: sedimentation and debris removal, Shawn Shouse, ISU Extension ag engineer; managing post flooding soils: flooded soil syndrome, Mahdi Al-Kaisi, ISU Extension soil specialist; cover crops for soil health, Paul Jasa, UNL Extension engineer; and leases and crop insurance on flooded land, William Edwards, ISU Extension farm management specialist. Rick Koelsch, UNL associate dean of extension, will moderate the panel.

“It is important for us to share information with those tasked with caring for farmland post flooding, but it is also important for Extension to hear the concerns and specific issues these folks have on their land,” said Shawn Shouse, extension ag engineer and planning committee member. “There is science that we can apply to this situation, but there is much that comes from farmer experience.”

Physical damage to farm ground may include obvious things like erosion and sand deposition. But some effects are invisible, having to do with the loss of soil microbes and soil structure. Land managers need to start planning and acting as the waters recede so that the soil can be productive again for next year.

“Using webinar technology helps us reach the most people on both sides of the river without having them travel great distances,” said John Wilson, UNL Extension educator and event co-chair. “It also allows for informal discussion at each site among those who have been most affected by the flood and with extension staff.”

In Iowa, the workshop will be held at the following ISU Extension offices: Fremont County in Sidney, Harrison County in Logan, Mills County in Malvern and Monona County in Onawa. ISU Extension in West Pottawattamie County is hosting the session at the Lied Multipurpose Center, 3501 Harry Langdon Blvd, Council Bluffs and Woodbury County Extension is hosting at a site to be determined. Nebraska viewing sites will be in Auburn at a site to be announced, in Blair at the Blair City Hall Council Chambers, in Dakota City at the USDA Service Center, in Falls City at the Courthouse, in Omaha at the Douglas/Sarpy Extension Office and in Tekamah at the City Auditorium. The Extension agriculture educator hosting the workshop at each location will be available after the webinar to address additional questions and concerns, if needed.

The webinar will also be available in South Dakota at the Davison County Extension Complex in Mitchell and in Kennebec at the Lyman County Courthouse. Further information on the Flood Recovery for Cropland Workshop, including additional sites and information as it becomes available, is available on ISU and UNL extension websites: www.extension.iastate.edu/topic/recovering-disasters and flood.unl.edu.



This article was published originally on 9/5/2011 The information contained within the article may or may not be up to date depending on when you are accessing the information.


Links to this material are strongly encouraged. This article may be republished without further permission if it is published as written and includes credit to the author, Integrated Crop Management News and Iowa State University Extension. Prior permission from the author is required if this article is republished in any other manner.