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12/13/2010 - 12/19/2010

Crop Advantage Series Provides Latest Crop Production Information

Brent Pringnitz, Corn and Soybean Initiative

Anyone involved in Iowa crop production should plan to attend a 2011 Crop Advantage Series meeting. The meetings provide information to help producers make profitable decisions for the upcoming growing season. Sponsored by Iowa State University Extension, the meetings will be held at 14 locations across Iowa in January.

Each location of the Crop Advantage Series has a variety of topics, including crops, pests, soil fertility and farm management. This year’s keynote address focuses on understanding sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybeans, a widespread problem for growers in 2010.

ISU Extension crop plant pathologists will be discussing the latest research with producers at each meeting. In addition, attendees can select from a full agenda of topics at each location to develop a personalized meeting agenda. Agenda topics that relate to local needs and production issues are selected by the ISU Extension field agronomists for each area meeting.

The Crop Advantage Series provides a statewide message on important issues yet retains local input on topics for that specific area. Because crop and pest management issues are different for each area of the state, the meetings are tailored to fit the needs of producers in that area.

In addition to receiving the latest research information from the university, the meetings have been a valuable way for producers to provide input back to ISU researchers and specialists on what their needs are.

Each of the meetings is approved for continuing education credits. Iowa Certified Crop Advisers can obtain up to seven CCA credits, depending on the location attended. Each location also offers the opportunity for private pesticide applicators to receive continuing education credits.

Advance registration for each location is $35 and includes workshop materials, lunch, and refreshments. An additional fee is charged for CCA credits and private pesticide applicator recertification. Registration less than one week prior to the meeting or at the door is $45. Registration materials are available at www.cropadvantage.org or from your local ISU Extension office.


2011 Crop Advantage schedule
Sheldon – Jan. 4
Osceola – Jan. 5
Ottumwa – Jan. 6
Burlington – Jan. 7
Ames – Jan. 11
Mason City – Jan. 12
Spirit Lake – Jan. 13
Storm Lake – Jan. 18
Cedar Rapids – Jan. 19
Fort Dodge – Jan. 20
LeMars – Jan. 24
Carroll – Jan. 25
Waterloo – Jan. 26
Atlantic – Jan. 27

 


Brent Pringnitz is an extension program specialist with ISU’s Corn and Soybean Initiative.

Certified Crop Adviser Exam Review Course Offered by ISU Extension

By Brent Pringnitz, Corn and Soybean Initiative 

Individuals planning to become a Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) can attend a two-day ISU Extension course to assist with exam preparation. ISU extension specialists will cover the performance objectives for the exam and provide additional assistance on topic areas of most concern to students. Students will take interactive quizzes during the course and finish with a practice examination.

The CCA Exam Review Course will be held Jan. 10-11 on the Iowa State campus in the Scheman Continuing Education Building, room 150. Registration opens at 8 a.m. with class work beginning at 8:30 a.m. and ending at 3:45 p.m. on Jan.11. Registration is limited to 60 participants; pre-registration is required. The program brochure and registration form are posted on the Web at www.aep.iastate.edu.

Cost of the course is $250. Registration and fees must be received by Jan. 5. Registrations will not be accepted at the door for this program. The fees include lunches, breaks and a copy of the Crop Diagnostic Notebook.

Registrations can be completed online with a credit card (MasterCard or VISA only) at www.aep.iastate.edu. Registrations may also be faxed with a credit card to 515-294-1311 or mailed along with a check or credit card information to: ISU Agribusiness Education Program, 2104B Agronomy Hall, Ames, Iowa, 50011-1010. For more information, call 515-294-6429 or email aep@iastate.edu.

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Brent Pringnitz is an extension program specialist with ISU’s Corn and Soybean Initiative.

ISU Extension Offers Soil Fertility Short Course

Brent Pringnitz, Corn and Soybean Initiative

With high input costs and volatile nutrient prices it is more important than ever to make sound management soil fertility decisions. ISU Extension will be offering a two-day short course focusing on principles of soils, soil fertility and nutrient management to help crop production professionals make informed decisions. In addition to classroom work, attendees will visit the ISU Soil and Plant Analysis Laboratory.

The Soil Fertility and Nutrient Management Short Course will be held Feb. 16-17 on the Iowa State campus at the Scheman Continuing Education Building, room 250. Registration opens at 8:30 a.m. with class work beginning at 9 a.m. and ending at 4:30 p.m. on Feb. 17. Registration is limited to 40 participants; pre-registration is required. The program brochure and registration form are posted on the Web at www.aep.iastate.edu.

The cost is $275. Registration and fees must be received by Feb. 9. Registrations will not be accepted at the door for this program. The fees cover a reference notebook, lunches and breaks.

Registrations can be completed online with a credit card (MasterCard or VISA only) at www.aep.iastate.edu. Registrations may also be faxed with a credit card to 515-294-1311 or be mailed along with a check or credit card information to: ISU Agribusiness Education Program, 2104B Agronomy Hall, Ames, Iowa, 50011-1010. For more information, call 515-294-6429 or email aep@iastate.edu.

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Brent Pringnitz is an extension program specialist with ISU’s Corn and Soybean Initiative.

Confinement Site Manure Applicator Workshops Scheduled for 2011

By Angela Rieck-Hinz, Department of Agronomy

Confinement site manure applicators and anyone interested in learning about manure issues should plan to attend a two-hour workshop offered by Iowa State University (ISU) Extension in January or February 2011. These workshops are offered in cooperation with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR). There is no fee to attend the workshops, but applicators will need to pay certification fees to complete certification requirements.

“Iowa law requires confinement site manure applicators to attend two hours of continuing education each year of their three-year certification period, or take and pass an exam once every three years,” said Angela Rieck-Hinz, ISU Extension program specialist and coordinator of the manure applicator certification program.

A total of 72 confinement site manure applicator workshops will be held in 63 Iowa counties. In addition, a series of seven dry/solid manure certification meetings will be held in February. ISU Extension county offices have a complete list of workshop dates and locations, or view a list at www.agronext.iastate.edu/immag/certification/11confinementsitebrochure.pdf

Workshop participants will learn about land application rules, separation distances for land application of manure, new rules regarding winter application of manure on snow-covered and frozen ground and manure nitrogen management issues. In addition, a video highlighting safety practices from pumping out deep-pits will be shared. 

The workshop serves as initial certification for those applicators who are not currently certified, recertification for those renewing licenses and continuing education for those applicators in their second or third year of their license. If a confinement livestock operation has more than 500 animal units, the operator must be certified to apply manure unless the manure is applied by a commercial manure applicator. The certification fee is $100 for a three-year certificate. Confinement site applicators also must pay the $25 annual education fee. All fees are submitted to Iowa DNR.

Due to uniform certification deadlines, applicators are encouraged to attend workshops prior to March 1 to avoid being assessed a late fee of $12.50. Those unable to attend one of the workshops need to schedule a time with their ISU Extension county office to watch the training DVD. Many extension offices will no longer accept walk-in appointments to watch these DVDs due to scheduling conflicts. Instead, county offices offer scheduled dates and times to provide this training.

Beginning March 1, applicators unable to attend training during one of the scheduled reshow dates at a county extension office will be charged a $10 fee to view the training at their convenience. There will not be a fee charged for scheduled training dates and live workshops. If attending the workshops or watching the two-hour training DVD is not convenient, confinement site manure applicators may contact their local DNR field office to schedule an appointment to take the certification exam to meet certification requirements.

Contact an ISU Extension county office for more information about the Manure Applicator Certification Program or visit www.agronext.iastate.edu/immag/mac.html.

 

 


Angela Rieck-Hinz is an extension program specialist for Iowa State University Extension and is the coordinator of the Iowa Manure Management Action Group (IMMAG). Rieck-Hinz can be reached at (515) 294-9590 or by emailing amrieck@iastate.edu.


Commercial Manure Applicator Training Scheduled for Jan. 6, 2011

By Angela Rieck-Hinz, Department of Agronomy

Commercial manure applicators can attend three hours of training on Thursday, Jan. 6, 2011, to meet annual commercial manure applicator certification requirements.

Iowa State University (ISU) Extension and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) will conduct Commercial Manure Applicator training from 9 a.m. to noon at 75 locations in Iowa, and four locations in surrounding states. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. There is no fee for the workshop but applicators must register by Dec. 30 with the ISU Extension county office where they plan to attend.  A complete list of county extension offices offering this workshop can be found at
www.agronext.iastate.edu/immag/certification/11macprogrampostcard.pdf

Commercial manure applicators wishing to recertify and those wanting to certify for the first time should attend. The workshop will provide the required three hours of annual training and will cover applicator rules, manure application on snow-covered and frozen ground, manure nitrogen management update and video on foaming pits and a review of case studies. 

All currently certified commercial manure applicator licenses will expire on March 1, 2011. Those wanting to renew must complete training requirements and submit forms and fees to the DNR prior to March 1 to avoid paying late fees. 

Applicators unable to attend the Jan. 6 program must schedule a time with their ISU Extension county office to watch the training DVD. Due to scheduling conflicts, many extension offices will no longer accept walk-in appointments to watch these DVDs. Instead county offices offer scheduled dates and times to provide this training.

Beginning March 1, applicators unable to attend training during one of the scheduled reshow dates at a county extension office, will be charged a $10 fee to view the training at their convenience. There will not be a fee charged for scheduled training dates and live workshops. If attending the workshops or watching the three-hour DVD is not convenient, commercial applicators may contact their local DNR field office to schedule an appointment to take the certification exam to meet certification requirements.

In addition to the commercial manure applicator training offered on Jan. 6, ISU Extension also will offer seven dry/solid manure workshops for commercial manure applicators in February 2011.  Information regarding these workshops and locations is also contained in the link to the brochure listed above.

Applicators with questions about the commercial manure applicator certification program should contact their ISU Extension county office or visit http://www.agronext.iastate.edu/immag/mac.html.

 

Angela Rieck-Hinz is an extension program specialist for Iowa State University Extension and is the coordinator of the Iowa Manure Management Action Group (IMMAG). Rieck-Hinz can be reached at (515) 294-9590 or by emailing amrieck@iastate.edu.

Winter Application of Manure: Regulations and Common Sense

By Angela Rieck-Hinz, Department of Agronomy

In 2009, the Iowa Legislature passed a bill pertaining to winter application of manure on snow-covered and frozen ground. The rules enforcing that legislation were completed earlier this year and went into effect on Sept. 15, 2010. 

This law applies to liquid manure from confinement feeding operations that have more than 500 animal units in confinement. This law does not apply to:
• manure from open feedlots
• dry manure (frozen manure is not dry manure)
• liquid manure from small animal feeding operations (confinements with 500 animal units or less)
• liquid manure that can be appropriately injected or incorporated on the same date of application

Confinement feeding operations with more than 500 animal units cannot legally apply liquid manure on snow-covered ground from Dec. 21 to April 1, or on frozen ground from Feb. 1 to April 1 except in an emergency.  Frozen ground is defined as “soil that is impenetrable due to frozen soil moisture but does not include soil that is frozen to a depth of two inches or less.”   Snow-covered ground is defined by “soil covered by one inch or more or snow or one-half inch or more of ice.” 

Operations regulated by these rules can apply manure in an emergency. The emergency must be defined by circumstances beyond the control of the owner and include, but is not limited to natural disasters, unusual weather, or equipment or structural failure. The emergency exemption does not apply to improperly designed or managed manure storage structures, the failure to account for the volume of manure to be stored. However, through the winter of 2014-2015 DNR will allow insufficient storage as a reason for emergency application. If you must apply manure under the emergency exemption, prior to land application of manure, you must contact DNR. You will also be required to report certain facts and follow a certain protocol to meet the emergency exemption requirements.

If you are a producer that is regulated by this law and you have inadequate storage to get you through the dates listed above, you should begin to take action to rectify the situation. This may include building additional storage or reducing animal numbers to reduce manure volume. 

 

Other Things to Consider 
Whether this law applies to you or not there are other things you must consider. 

• Do you have a NPDES permit?  Make sure you know and follow the requirements of your NPDES permit which may limit winter application. 

• Do you have a nutrient management plan or comprehensive nutrient management plan from NRCS?  If so, you need to carefully review your plan to determine if you can apply manure in the winter. NRCS plans are based on the Iowa 590 Standard and that standard does not allow winter application of manure, except in defined emergencies, and that standard applies to all sources of manure.

• If your operation is required to follow the Master Matrix, then make sure you are in compliance with land application for the Matrix since you may have gotten points for injecting or incorporating manure and winter may cause you to surface apply manure. 

 

Common Sense
Whether you are regulated or not, application of manure on frozen or snow covered ground is not recommended. The potential loss of nutrients to surface water can be significant based on snow depth, snow melt and rapid runoff.  Proper storage or stockpiling of manure for spring application protects water quality and the dollar value of the nutrients in the manure. The DNR, Legislature, EPA and your neighbors are closely scrutinizing winter manure application and if the new regulations and related penalties are not sufficient to protect water quality there may be additional restrictions.  At what point will this winter application law apply to all animal feeding operations in Iowa?

Manure application on snow-covered ground.

 

Angela Rieck-Hinz is an extension program specialist for Iowa State University Extension and is the coordinator of the Iowa Manure Management Action Group (IMMAG). Rieck-Hinz can be reached at (515) 294-9590 or by emailing amrieck@iastate.edu.



This article was published originally on 12/20/2010 The information contained within the article may or may not be up to date depending on when you are accessing the information.


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