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6/21/2010 - 6/27/2010

Refuge in a Bag is Here: Explaining the Simplified Refuge

By Aaron Gassmann and Erin Hodgson, Department of Entomology

Pioneer HiBred has introduced two new products into the U.S. corn market, Optimum AcreMax RW (OAM RW) and Optimum AcreMax 1 (OAM 1). Both products have been approved by the EPA and are commercially available as a new option to consider for the 2011 growing season. Pioneer is the first company to offer "in the bag" refuge for Bt corn. The OAM RW and OAM 1 blends each contain 90 percent Bt corn that targets corn rootworm and a 10 percent rootworm refuge. While a potentially convenient benefit, some growers may find that this complicates refuge planting. Let’s run through the basics.   

What is in OAM 1?
This blended seed contains 90 percent Herculex XTRA (CRW/CB/LL/RR2) with a Cruiser Extreme 250 seed treatment and 10 percent Herculex I (CB/LL/RR2) with a Poncho 1250 seed treatment. To meet all EPA refuge requirements, OAM 1 will need to be planted with a European corn borer refuge of 20 percent.  For the 20 percent European corn borer refuge, growers can choose to plant a conventional seed, herbicide tolerant hybrid or OAM RW. The refuge can be planted up to one half mile away from the OAM 1 field.

What is OAM RW?
This blended seed contains 90 percent Herculex RW (CRW/RR2) with a Cruiser Extreme 250 seed treatment and 10 percent Roundup Ready Corn 2 with a Poncho 1250 seed treatment. Because OAM RW does not contain Bt that targets European corn borer, it can be used to fulfill the corn borer refuge requirement with OAM 1.

What are the advantages to OAM technology?
Growers that use OAM technologies will be compliant of all EPA refuge requirements for corn rootworm. This should simplify some of the overall planting activities. However, growers will still need to select a separate seed for the 20 percent European corn borer refuge.

With increased refuge compliance and a blended refuge, OAM1 should act to delay the development of corn rootworm resistance to Bt corn. Computer modeling conducted by Pioneer Hi-Bred predicts that AcreMax technologies should delay the development of resistance by rootworm to the Bt corn rootworm trait for 12 years compared with nine years for a traditional block refuge. The company predicts this delay in resistance because any resistant adults that emerge from Bt corn are more likely to encounter and mate with susceptible adults from the blended refuge plants. 

As another planting option, growers could plant 100 percent OAM RW if European corn borer pressure was very low. Only one type of seed could be used for the entire farm, because a separate refuge is not required for corn rootworm.

Are there disadvantages to OAM?
As with any pest management program, growers should assess corn rootworm pressure and determine if OAM 1 or OAM RW is a necessary additional cost. For example, crop rotation and soil-applied insecticides may sufficiently control corn rootworm. Although all the seed will have an insecticidal seed treatment and herbicide tolerance, approximately 10 percent of the seed will not be protected against corn rootworm. Those individual refuge plants in the blend may experience injury and yield loss. Additionally, in the case of OAM 1, a 20 percent  European corn borer refuge will still need to be planted. 

 

 

 

 

Erin Hodgson is an assistant professor of entomology with extension and research responsibilities. She can be contacted by email at ewh@iastate.edu or phone (515) 294-2847. Aaron Gassmann is an assistant professor of entomology with research and teaching responsibilities in insect pest management. He can be contacted by email at aaronjg@iastate.edu or (515) 294-7623

Crop Management Clinic Features Over 20 Management Topics

By Brent Pringnitz, Field Extension Education Laboratory

Registration is now underway for the 2010 Crop Management Clinic to be held July 14-15 at the Field Extension Education Laboratory (FEEL) near Ames. The Crop Management Clinic is an intensive two-day training program that focuses on the latest developments in crop production and protection. Attendees can select from 20 different topics to develop a course agenda that fits their specific interests and needs. ISU Extension specialists will be discussing the impacts of common crop problems, how to avoid them and methods to improve productivity. The curriculum is divided into four primary areas: crop management, pest management, nutrient management and soil, water and tillage. A detailed listing of scheduled topics is available at the clinic Web page.

Sessions are taught by ISU Extension faculty from the departments of Agronomy, Entomology, Plant Pathology and Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering. Each session includes hands-on training in demonstration plots at FEEL in small-group settings that enhance instructor-student interaction.

The Crop Management Clinic is approved for up to 12 Certified Crop Adviser CEUs. Credits in each CEU category are dependent on sessions selected by the student.

Registration is required for this program and space is limited. Registration is $250 and includes lunches, breaks and course references. To register for this program, or for more details on the course, visit the FEEL website. For program questions please contact the Agribusiness Education Program at (515) 432-9548 or aep@iastate.edu.

The Field Extension Education Laboratory (FEEL) is a 43-acre teaching and demonstration facility that has been training crop production professionals since 1987. FEEL is coordinated by the Iowa State University Corn and Soybean Initiative. For a full listing of educational programs available, visit www.aep.iastate.edu.


 

 

Brent Pringnitz is program coordinator at the Field Extension Education Laboratory. He can be reached at 515/294-9487 or by email at bpring@iastate.edu.

Field Diagnostic Clinic is a Return to the Basics

By Brent Pringnitz, Field Extension Education Laboratory

Make plans to attend the 2010 Field Diagnostic Clinic to be held July 12-13 at the Field Extension Education Laboratory (FEEL) near Ames. This program focuses on the fundamentals of crop plant diagnostics. Sessions focus on insect, weed and crop disease identification, herbicide injury, nutrient deficiency symptoms and understanding crop growth and development. For someone new to field diagnostics the clinic will provide fundamental training to provide accurate diagnosis of crop and pest problems. The program will also challenge experienced agronomists to identify new pests and crop problems and refresh skills needed on a daily basis to provide sound agronomic advice. 

Sessions are taught by ISU Extension faculty from the departments of Agronomy, Entomology and Plant Pathology. Each session includes intensive, hands-on training in demonstration plots at FEEL in small-group settings that enhance instructor-student interaction.

The Field Diagnostic Clinic is approved for Certified Crop Adviser CEUs: 5.0 crop management, 6.5 pest management, and 1.5 nutrient management.  

Registration is required for this program and space is limited. Registration is $250 and includes all meals, breaks and course references. To register for this program, or for more details on the course, visit the FEEL website. For program questions please contact the Field Extension Education Laboratory at (515) 432-9548 or aep@iastate.edu

The Field Extension Education Laboratory (FEEL) is a 43-acre teaching and demonstration facility that has been training crop production professionals since 1987. FEEL is coordinated by the Iowa State University Corn and Soybean Initiative. For a full listing of educational programs available, visit www.aep.iastate.edu.

 

 

 

Brent Pringnitz is program coordinator at the Field Extension Education Laboratory. He can be reached at 515/294-9487 or by email at bpring@iastate.edu.

ISU Extension Offers Ag Drainage School

By Brent Pringnitz, Department of Agronomy and Matt Helmers, Department of Ag and Biosystems Engineering

Agricultural drainage is becoming increasingly important due to the critical role it plays for Iowa's emerging bio-economy. Drainage systems that are properly designed and operating are essential to achieving excellent agricultural production capability.

The Iowa Drainage School is being offered to address these issues on July 27-29 at the Borlaug Learning Center on the Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm near Nashua, Iowa.

"People looking to install a new drainage system or retrofit an existing system will want to attend this school," said Matt Helmers, ISU Extension agricultural engineer. "The workshop will focus on drainage design, economics of drainage, water management and legal issues related to drainage."

The intent of the Iowa Drainage School is to provide training about
• agricultural drainage concepts
• planning and laying out drainage systems including surveying a profile
• calculating tile line sizes and spacing using actual field data
• making connections and setting up drainage control structures
• NRCS and IDDA regulatory considerations
• fixing common drainage system issues

Drainage contractors, landowners, professional engineers and consultants, NRCS professionals, county administrators and others who are involved in making drainage design decisions within their respective businesses and organizations are invited to attend.

This is a three-day school with each day including a combination of hands-on training, lecture and discussion, and problem solving using examples. By attending this school, participants will be able to plan and layout subsurface drainage systems and work out project costs.

Registration fees for this three-day school are $300 per person if registered by midnight, July 16. Late registration is $350 and must be received by July 23. Class size is limited to 40 participants and pre-registration is required. Registration fees include meals indicated on the agenda, refreshments and handouts.

Additional information, a detailed agenda and registration are available online.

 

 

Brent Pringnitz is program specialist in the Agronomy Department. He can be reached at 515/294-9487 or by email at bpring@iastate.edu. Matt Helmers is a program specialist in Ag and Biosystems Engineering. He can be reached at  515-294-6717 or by email at mhelmers@iastate.edu.



This article was published originally on 6/28/2010 The information contained within the article may or may not be up to date depending on when you are accessing the information.


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