Outputs and Outcomes

Below are results from an assessment strategy and instrument prepared by Jean Eells and Janet Toering (now retired) 2009-2010

CLL Outputs and Usage Data

Number of responses and descriptions of respondents:

  • 227 Adults
  • 133 Classroom Teachers
  • 24 Daycare Providers
  • 14 Volunteers
  • 10 Specialist (AITC, Naturalists)     
  • 10 Extension (County director, 4-H and Families staff, 4-H leaders)  
  • 10 Other (Residential Staff, Greenhouse, Prison, Summer School, etc.)
  • 5 Home Educators
  • 4 Program Leaders
  • 1 Student Teacher

Number of youth participating in CLL lessons:

  • 12,814 Youth
  • 66% Grades K through 4 (Elementary)  
  • 15% Age 3 to PreK (Early Childhood)     
  • 15% Grades 5 through 8 (Middle School)    
  • 66% Grades K through 4 (Elementary)
  • 3% Grades 9 – 12 (High School)

Outdoor settings where youth and adults are participating in CLL lessons:

  • 55 School or daycare gardens
  • 31 Public parks, fairgrounds, etc.
  • 25 Farms
  • 17 Community gardens
  • 14 Prairies & wetlands
  • 10 Greenhouses
  • 20 Other

Number of teachers reporting CLL use in each subject matter area:

  • 190 Science or Environmental Studies
  • 101 Reading and Language Arts
  • 60 Health
  • 53 Social Studies
  • 45 Math
  • 32 Iowa History

Number of popular general comments made regarding ISUE CLL curricula and programs:

  • 19 Adaptable / fits our program / enhances our curriculum / easy-to-use / age appropriate
  • 17 Appreciate Sue Cook and others that go into classrooms to lead lessons
  • 14 Great / excellent / awesome / fantastic / wonderful / fun materials
  • 10 Students look forward to / get excited / enjoy the lessons and activities
  • 10 Thank you for the program and materials
  • 7 This is beneficial for the students
  • 6 We love this curriculum / program / the activities

 

CLL Outcomes

Estimated number of students during or after CLL activities showed new evidence of the following:

  • 11,533+ Had fun and participated in a new activity
  • 10,251+ Made a new connection with nature, had a new understanding of the food they eat, and made comments reflecting new knowledge
  • 7,945+ Showed improved oral and written communication skills

Conclusions from "Examples examples that indicate changes in students' attitudes."

  • Youth were excited about / looking forward to science (21)
  • Made comments or showed how to care for / respect the environment (17)
  • Were open to learning / liked to learn (16)
  • Tried a new food (15)
  • Were more aware of the environment / importance of natural resources (15)
  • Shared information they learned / encouraged family to do something they learned (14)
  • Expressed fun / joy / happiness (13)
  • Were more attentive / engaged / "loved"
  • Participating (12)
  • + Others 

(178 total examples)

Conclusions from "Examples that indicate changes in students' knowledge."

Key indicators were students abilities to demonstrate understanding and learning, transfer or apply their knowledge to something else, share in discussions, and write about what they learned. Students shared what they learned at home. 

Top content areas were:

  • Characteristics of plants (33)
  • Gardening and farming (29)
  • Where food comes from (24)
  • Trying and choosing healthy foods (21)
  • Food categories/MyPyramid (20)
  • Composting/worms (16),
  • Natural resources (15)
  • Seeds (13)

(296 total examples)

Conclusions from "Examples that indicate changes in students' behaviors."

  • Youth were more engaged / participatory / attentive / followed instructions better / positive / not messing around  (38)
  • Cared for the environment / picked up / created posters / showed care and respect / voluntarily picked up garbage / demonstrated water and soil conservation practices (21)
  • Helped parents plant / shop / make healthy food choices / compost (14)
  • More interested in doing things outdoors (13)
  • Chose healthy food for meals and parties (12)
  • Willing to try new things (11)
  • + Others

(140 total examples)

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